Mexico

In a bid to remake its violent image, the Mexican city of Juárez is dismantling a huge sign along the U.S. border that reads: "No More Weapons!"

The sign, made from the steel of guns seized by Mexican authorities, was erected in 2012 by former President Felipe Calderón as a protest to the illegal trade of weapons with the U.S.

The AP reports:

In the U.S., the Supreme Court's widely anticipated ruling on same-sex marriage has been the focus of nonstop speculation and debate. In Mexico, meanwhile, the highest court effectively legalized same-sex unions this month with a decision that was so low key many failed to notice.

Mexico's Supreme Court quietly published an opinion, known as a jurisprudential thesis, ruling that defining marriage as a union only between a man and a woman is discriminatory and in violation of Mexico's constitution.

Wikimedia

MEXICO CITY — The Mexican government says it is working with the United States in the investigation into a shooting attack on a U.S. Customs and Border Protection helicopter on June 5, but says it “categorically rejects any attempt to see the border as a security threat.”

Mexico’s Foreign Relations Department said Thursday the U.S. border informed the Mexican government that it would send two Blackhawk helicopters to patrol the Texas border area where the helicopter was hit.

The apparently unarmored chopper was forced to make an emergency landing in Laredo, Texas, after bullets hit the ride side of the aircraft and the rotor blade.

Mexico Loosening Rules for Armed U.S. Agents

Jun 9, 2015
Jennifer Whitney / The Texas Tribune

After decades of forbidding foreign law enforcement officers from carrying weapons on Mexican soil, the Mexican government is on the verge of allowing U.S. agents to carry guns in places where they help speed the flow of goods between the two countries. 

Texas lawmakers are celebrating the move as a significant step toward increasing trade, and say Mexico is also expected to draw up new rules allowing security personnel for visiting dignitaries to obtain permits to carry weapons. 

In August, the Mexican and United States governments are expected to finalize details of a permitting process that will allow U.S. immigration and customs agents to carry arms while working in foreign trade zones, U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar, D-Laredo, said Monday.

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