Mike Villarreal

Flickr user biologycorner (Shannan Muskopf) / cc

State Board of Education Vice Chairman Thomas Ratliff wants people to know that charter school superintendents are making more money -- at times surprisingly more money -- than their public school peers. He wants to know if the schools that are run like a business, but take state funds per student, are using those state funds wisely.

Ryan Poppe / TPR News

In the coming week, lawmakers will begin examining curriculum standards set by the Texas State Board of Education under House Bill 5, a law passed in 2013 that provides more flexibility and pathways for student growth, and there is an effort to add more rigorous courses in math and science.

From its very conception, higher education officials and some within the business community have taken issue with HB 5 because it dropped student requirements for taking courses like Algebra II.

Mose Buchele for KUT

Texas Matters: Residents in North Texas are dealing with the increased frequency of small earthquakes that some people are linking to oil and gas drilling in the area. State Rep. Mike Villarreal talks about the possible conflict of interest with William White, who as chair of the Texas Finance Commission is also vice president of a payday loan company. Also on this show: Population growth in Texas and the Kallison ranching family.

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

The Alamo Golden Ale's motto is "Brewed with a fiercely independent spirit," and that's what it took, almost literally, for Eugene Simor to see the groundbreaking on his near-Eastside brewery.

The location is symbolic. Alamo Golden Ale, along with German lagers and seasonal selections, will be brewed about 12 minutes from the site of the sacred grounds of the Alamo.

"For the last 10 years I've brewed just one single product, which is Alamo Golden Ale," Simor said. "So considering that I just have one beer, we've actually done pretty good with our sales."

David Martin Davies / TPR News

The Affordable Care Act's online health insurance exchanges go live on Oct. 1, which is where many people without health insurance can pick a plan and enroll.

One out of four Texans do not have health insurance -- the largest percentage of uninsured in the nation -- and leaves the state with over 6 million potential customers for the health insurance exchanges.