Museum Reach

John Mize/Jack Morgan

Looking at the Museum Reach today, it’s hard to even imagine the way it looked eight years ago.

"It was a trapezoidal ditch, with a very little water that ran down the middle of it," said architect Irby Hightower, who co-chaired the San Antonio River Oversight Committee with former Mayor Lila Cockrell.

Eileen Pace / TPR

With great fanfare on May 30, 2009, the Museum Reach stretch of the River Walk opened to the public.  But as interesting as the Museum Reach is, the story of how it came about is equally so. 

Eileen Pace / TPR

Five years have passed since the Museum Reach stretch of the River Walk, which starts at the Pearl development and flows down to the Lexington Street bridge, right next to the new Tobin Center, was opened to the public. Beginning today, a series on the art-filled, artfully-executed area.

On May 30, 2009, thousands gathered on and around Brooklyn Avenue bridge in downtown San Antonio for the ceremonial opening of the Museum Reach—the completely re-imagined stretch of the San Antonio River.

The 1.3 miles of the river looked nothing like it did just four years before. 

Eileen Pace / TPR

As the investigation continues into the cause of the oil spill that heavy rains carried into the San Antonio River on the final Saturday of Fiesta last month, officials say the spill has been remediated and restoration is almost complete. 

They said it was a perfect storm: An unknown amount of oil spilling into the street during Fiesta, when hundreds of cars had driven up and down Broadway, and a heavy rain that washed everything down the hill on 10th Street and into the river along the east bank of the Museum Reach.

Eileen Pace / TPR News

Several agencies are now investigating an oil spill that flowed into the San Antonio River at 10th Street last weekend.

So much rain came down over the weekend and Monday that it is difficult for the agencies to measure the amount of oil that washed down Avenue B to 10th Street, over the berms, through the grass, and into the river.

Tests by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality have determined that the spill was petroleum oil.