Music

Deborah Conner

A special concert is coming to the Texas Hill Country. It's called Peace on Earth: A Holiday Special. Here's Music Director Gene Dowdy.

"Thursday, Dec. 3, at 7:30 p.m. at the Kathleen Cailloux Theater, the Symphony of the Hills is going to offer our holiday special."

The program's filled with holiday music, both spiritual and secular.

Native American youth living on reservations can often face an overwhelming array of challenges, including poverty, addiction and abuse. Partly because of hurdles, high school dropout rates and suicides are far higher on reservations than the national average.

From Texas Standard:

Last year, music streaming services like Pandora and Spotify generated more revenue than CD sales. Musicians say they aren’t happy with how much they’re getting in return, especially now that streaming companies like Amazon, Google, and even NPR, have formed a lobbying group to try to lower the amount they pay to musicians. 

Scott Newton / Wikimedia Commons

DALLAS — Plans are in the works in Dallas for an art piece honoring blues guitarist brothers Stevie Ray and Jimmie Vaughan at a park located just blocks from the home where they grew up.

The Dallas Morning News reports that documentary filmmaker Kirby Warnock has been working since last year with Kay Kallos, the public art program manager in the City of Dallas’ Office of Cultural Affairs, to secure a spot in the Oak Cliff neighborhood’s Kiest Park to honor the late Stevie Ray Vaughan and his older brother, Jimmie.

It's “been a long, slow slog,” says Warnock, whose 2013 documentary When Dallas Rocked lamented the lack of a Stevie Ray Vaughan memorial in Dallas. “But it will be worth it.”

Stevie Ray Vaughan, a two-time Grammy winner, was killed in a 1990 helicopter crash at the age of 35. This month he’s set to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Warnock’s website on the project says it has the approval of Jimmie Vaughan.

Mary Does That Thing She Does At Unofficial SXSW Show

Mar 18, 2015
From www.maryjblige.com

AUSTIN — Mary J. Blige performed for a feverish crowd Tuesday night at the Samsung Supper Club, in an event not sponsored by South by Southwest, another sign of unofficial concerts rivaling the festival when it comes to pulling big-name acts.

Blige is no dancer, but the performer moved energetically at the show, even imitating Michael Jackson’s dance moves during her funky hit, Just Fine. She kicked off her set with Enough Cryin’ — which features her rapping as her alter ego Brook-Lynn — and she continued with the up-tempo anthem, The One. She moved like a pro, though there was water dripping from the covered ceiling on the venue’s rooftop. She managed to maneuver in heels and an ab-revealing crop top.

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