New Mexico

Flickr user Fibonacci Blue / cc

On Fronteras this week:

·        Same-sex marriage is the law of the land but in Texas some county officials are resisting

·        A civil rights expert and legal scholar says efforts to slow implementation of Supreme Court rulings is nothing new.  He puts the same-sex marriage ruling into historical context.

·        Congressional Democrats are raising questions about detention centers holding women and children.

·        Tijuana residents are asking the government to save an old river habitat threatened by development.

Texas Tribune

— Last summer tens of thousands of unaccompanied Central American minors crossed the Rio Grande and entered the United States.  Many were fleeing violence in their countries.  Ambassador Thomas Shannon tells Fronteras the U.S. government is hoping a plan being implemented will prevent another wave of child migrants.  

—After living illegally for years in the United States many residents of  Tijuana, Mexico,  are being deported to Mexico.   Read on for why they're waiting in Tijuana.

Inspiration can come from unlikely places. For composer Robert Kyr, the silence of a desert monastery is key to the radiant music on his new disc of recent choral works performed by the vocal ensemble Conspirare and its director Craig Hella Johnson.

Kyr travels frequently to the Monastery of Christ in the Desert, in northern New Mexico, from his home in Eugene, Ore., where he teaches composition at the University of Oregon. Living among the monastery's Benedictine monks, Kyr hikes along the winding Chama River by day and composes music in a bare-walled room at night.

Lorne Matalon

Fronteras: Federal prosecutors in Texas and New Mexico are dealing with an unusual case involving a man from a Mennonite community in Mexico. We take you into the fields of New Mexico where workers are cleaning out an ancient irrigation system. These hand-dug ditches may help retain precious river water in times of drought. Further south, drought is forcing a Mexican city to ration water -- and it's only spring.

Laurel Morales / Fronteras

Fronteras: As California struggles with its water crisis and the rest of the southwest deals with drought, some criticize Arizona farmers for exporting some of their crops overseas. In the final part of our series "Pipe Dreams" we look at the controversy of indirectly exporting water overseas. A new lawsuit in Arizona federal court is trying to block new state abortion restrictions from taking effect on April 1. What's at stake in that state's latest legal fight over abortion? Also, crowded college classrooms have some U.S. students heading south of the border for their higher education.

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