NRA

Cooper Neill / Texas Tribune

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — The parade of potential Republican presidential candidates speaking at the National Rifle Association’s annual convention isn’t one to make waves with the powerful gun-rights group. The contenders are sitting pretty in NRA ratings of their positions on gun issues, with scores ranging from A to A-minus.

The speakers get 10 minutes each on Friday to preach to the choir on their pro-gun bona fides. “This is the ultimate choir,” said Chip Saltsman, who ran the 2008 presidential campaign of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, among the speakers at the event. “Any time you get 70,000 pro-Second Amendment people in one place, it’s a good opportunity for anybody running on the Republican side.”

Paul Flahive / ©

    

In very few places has the syntax of a sentence caused more excitement, passion, hatred, and hyperbole than the Second Amendment in the Bill of Rights.

"A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

Is the militia a limitation on who gets guns? The people an afterthought? Or, is it the other way around and the militia is the less important of the two?

Flickr user Adam Fagen (afagen) / cc

In a rare case that pitted Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott against the National Rifle Association, the U.S. Supreme Court has declined to hear a case involving the NRA’s request to lower the age limit for conceal-carry permits and purchasing a firearm.

Abbott defended Texas Department of Public Safety Director Col. Steve McCraw in his assessment that lowering the age requirement for anyone applying for a conceal handgun license from 21 to 18 would disrupt public safety.