nurses

Enrique Cerna / KCTS 9

This week on Fronteras:

  • Immigrant rights activists  in San Diego protest Congress’ inaction on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.
  • A San Antonio charter school aims to increase rate of students who go on to earn college degrees (1:46).
  • A Dallas high school offers low-income and refugee students a crash course in financial literacy (5:51).
  • The push by a national organization to recruit Hispanic nurses (10:45).

Brenda Andrade

Over 3 million registered nurses practice in the U.S.  Of those, only 7 percent are Hispanic, despite Hispanics making up 17 percent of the population.

This disparity has highlighted the need to recruit nurses of color into nursing schools. A five-year, $1.5 million National Institutes of Health grant, the Science Education Partnership Award, is making it possible to reach out through media resources to teachers and students in high school and college.

 


BRANDON QUESTER / INEWSOURCE

This week on Fronteras:

  • “Promotoras” initiative to help some San Antonio families on the west side reduce incidents of child abuse.
  • New Mexico aims to get more students of color into nursing programs (8:19).
  • A modern day vigilante stands guard on his property along the U.S./Mexico border (12:08).
  • A Dallas artist takes a whack at gentrification with a Latin party favor (16:14).


From Texas Standard:

Texas is at the epicenter of an aging boom. Texans are getting older, but older folks from other parts of the country are also moving here. With age comes failing health, and an increased need for assistance with performing daily living tasks at home. Many people with physical disabilities also need this kind of assistance. And the people who provide attendant care in Texas are among the lowest-paid in the nationOnly Mississippi pays less.

Did we mention Texas also has some of the most expensive cities to live in?

 

Nurse Who Survived Ebola Sues Hospital System

Mar 3, 2015

DALLAS — The Dallas hospital that treated the first patient to be diagnosed in the U.S. with Ebola lied to Congress when it said its staff was trained to handle the deadly virus, a nurse who contracted the disease contends in a lawsuit filed Monday.

Nina Pham, who was an intensive care unit nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, says after being told last fall that she would be treating a patient suspected of having Ebola, “the sum total” of information she was given to protect herself was “what her manager ‘Googled’ and printed out from the Internet.”