opera

The last time New York's Metropolitan Opera presented a work written by a woman was 113 years ago. It's a drought that lasted longer than the years between the Cubs' World Series victories. That situation has finally been rectified this week with the New York premiere of the opera L'Amour de Loin by Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho.

Christmas is coming, and soon TV screens everywhere will light up with that 1946 holiday classic, It's a Wonderful Life. But the same story is coming a little early to the stage of the Houston Grand Opera. That's right: An operatic version of George Bailey's struggle with life and death opens this Friday.

Librettist Gene Scheer admits that adapting such a beloved movie has sometimes felt like a fool's errand. "It's almost secular scripture, this piece," he says. "Everyone knows all the lines."

Joyce DiDonato is one of the most acclaimed opera singers of her generation; this year, she won the Grammy for Best Classical Vocal Solo. Her latest album, In War and Peace: Harmony Through Music, is a collection of baroque arias from the 17th and 18th centuries divided into two sections — one addressing war, the other, peace.

Nathan Cone

Mezzo-soprano Julie Boulianne was forthright in the description of her recent recital for the Tuesday Musical Club.

“I’m from Quebec, we tell the truth no matter what!” she joked, before explaining that her program was made up largely of already-familiar-to-her repertoire because she’s in between debut roles in two different opera companies.

It was to the audience’s benefit, though. Boulianne possessed a beautiful control of her voice, both in melody and volume for the hall, Laurel Heights United Methodist Church.

courtesy the artist

A singer hits San Antonio this evening, bringing with him a new performance genre. That singer is Korean Baritone Claudio Jung, known for singing opera arias, European songs, Korean lyric songs--he's from Korea--and others. And now, he's singing this.

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