Dario Acosta

Mezzo-soprano Isabel Leonard made her Metropolitan Opera debut in 2007 singing the role of Stéphano in Charles Gounod’s “Roméo et Juliette.” Since then, her Met appearances have included Blanche in Francis Poulenc’s haunting “Dialogues of the Carmelites,” and Rosina in Rossini's “The Barber of Seville,” which she reprises this season.

courtesy John Dooley

A scrappy opera organization is staging a one-of-a-kind event. I found out more by speaking to John Dooley. John has sung at New York’s Metropolitan Opera, the Lincoln Center, and the Pittsburgh Opera, but he’s now decided to take things underground.

“I’m performing with the Texas Hill Country Opera — a concert in The Cave Without a Name.”

Has he ever sung in a cave?

“No, no, I’ve never taken my talent underground.”

So he’s getting really low.

“Exactly, exactly. It’ll be an interesting experience. But I hear the acoustics can’t be beat.”

Maybe this trajectory mirrors the Kansas City Royals' unlikely road to the pennant: An opera star beats out much more mainstream artists to sing the national anthem at the decisive World Series Game 7.

Janet Rogers

It’s a good time to be an opera fan in San Antonio. In addition to the newly-formed Opera San Antonio, Opera Piccola, led by longtime singer and impresario Mark Richter, opens their third season this weekend at the historic Empire Theatre. On the bill are two one-act operas that capture America in the 1950s.

Former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani was among those who showed up at the Metropolitan Opera last night to denounce the production of The Death of Klinghoffer, which protesters say glorifies terrorism.

Chanting "Shame on the Met!" protesters, numbering about 400, said the performance of the 23-year-old opera was an affront to the memory of Leon Klinghoffer, a passenger on the Italian cruise liner Achille Lauro that was hijacked by members of the Palestinian Liberation Organization in 1985. Klinghoffer, 69, was shot in his wheelchair and dumped overboard.