performing arts

The Convergent Media Collective

It’s a once-every-three-months gathering that really gets San Antonians thinking. And it’s got a funny little name: PechaKucha San Antonio.

Vicki Yuan is organizer for PechaKucha, and she explained more about the concept behind it:

“Pechakucha is a Japanese term for chit-chat. It’s a concept for a lecture series style event,” she said.

PechaKucha started in Japan as a venue to allow young architects to display and talk about their work. It’s evolved to include other disciplines, and Yuan explained the way it works:

For the last six years, the Last Casas Foundation has been busy doling out college money in talent contests. This year it's taken one step further.

“We’ve given out $500,000 in college scholarship money to graduating seniors in San Antonio and the surrounding area," said Kevin Parman, the president of Las Casas. It all started with a 135 applications.

“And we get that number down to 24 finalists,” said Parman.

And those finalists really have to perform to earn their scholarship money, as Parman explained.

You may not have heard of the dance form called “stepping,” but don't feel bad. I didn't! Here's a description:

"A lot of people describe it as highly energetic and powerful movement. And rhythmic chants often accompany the steps as well. It’s really celebrated all around the world, but a lot of Americans don’t know about," said C. Bryan Williams about the foot-pounding, knee slapping moves that he helped bring to the fore in the group he’s created, Step Afrika.

Jeffrey Truitt

It’s not "American Idol," but there’s a fierce competition going on Sunday night.  It’s a talent competition limited to regional high school students.  

"This year we started off with 140 applicants," said Kevin Parman, the president of the Las Casas board, the organization putting on the competition.

“And those applications came in from 54 different schools," he said. "That’s very exciting, to see that there’s not just one concentration in the city that’s participating in this.”

I asked how many students made the final cut.

Dwayne Green

Classic Theatre is living up to its name by tackling another classic: "Private Lives," one of Broadway’s most revived and popular of plays. Classic as it is, it’s got an odd plot line.

"Elliot and Amanda have been married before, and they divorced," said Anna Gangai, who plays Amanda.

“Five years later they are each married to two different types of people," Gangai said. "And they are on their honeymoon night in adjoining rooms, unbeknownst to them, in the south of France. Comedy ensues, I’ll put it that way.”

Comedy, and what sounds like tense moments.

Pages