performing arts

Joan Marcus

It's been a Broadway smash for years, and now it's back in San Antonio. One of the production's stars is, no surprise, really impressed with the production. He's Billy Tighe, and he thinks The Book of Mormon's magic all started with those who wrote it, because they saw something in a highly unlikely subject.

"The creators of South Park and Bobby Lopez were endlessly fascinated by it and knew there was a well of  comedy in there," says Tighe. 

SAY Sí's Media Arts Studio

Another weekend barreling towards us, and we've been looking into things you really ought to consider doing. As usual, it looks full, fun and there's something for everyone. First let's go to Southtown for Say Si's Muertitosfest

The Convergent Media Collective

It’s a once-every-three-months gathering that really gets San Antonians thinking. And it’s got a funny little name: PechaKucha San Antonio.

Vicki Yuan is organizer for PechaKucha, and she explained more about the concept behind it:

“Pechakucha is a Japanese term for chit-chat. It’s a concept for a lecture series style event,” she said.

PechaKucha started in Japan as a venue to allow young architects to display and talk about their work. It’s evolved to include other disciplines, and Yuan explained the way it works:

For the last six years, the Last Casas Foundation has been busy doling out college money in talent contests. This year it's taken one step further.

“We’ve given out $500,000 in college scholarship money to graduating seniors in San Antonio and the surrounding area," said Kevin Parman, the president of Las Casas. It all started with a 135 applications.

“And we get that number down to 24 finalists,” said Parman.

And those finalists really have to perform to earn their scholarship money, as Parman explained.

You may not have heard of the dance form called “stepping,” but don't feel bad. I didn't! Here's a description:

"A lot of people describe it as highly energetic and powerful movement. And rhythmic chants often accompany the steps as well. It’s really celebrated all around the world, but a lot of Americans don’t know about," said C. Bryan Williams about the foot-pounding, knee slapping moves that he helped bring to the fore in the group he’s created, Step Afrika.

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