Philip Glass

Tiny Desk Concerts
1:36 pm
Thu December 4, 2014

Dublin Guitar Quartet: Tiny Desk Concert

Claire Eggers NPR

Originally published on Sat December 6, 2014 4:09 pm

Don't ask the members of the Dublin Guitar Quartet to play the time-honored classics of the Spanish repertoire. They might play traditional Spanish style classical guitars, but they're not your standard guitar ensemble. The Dubliners are strictly devoted to contemporary music. They've been commissioning new pieces and adapting others for both acoustic and electric guitars since 2002, when the group formed at the Dublin Conservatory of Music and Drama.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:51 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

Philip Glass And Steve Reich At BAM: Together Again Yet Still Apart

Four Organs by Steve Reich was performed Tuesday at the Brooklyn Academy of Music as part of the 50th anniversary of the Nonesuch label (from left: Philip Glass, Nico Muhly, David Cossin, Timo Andres and Steve Reich).
Stephanie Berger

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 3:04 pm

Throughout this month, the Brooklyn Academy of Music's signature Next Wave Festival is celebrating a record label with which it shares history and purpose: Nonesuch, marking its 50th anniversary this year.

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Music Interviews
4:15 pm
Sat October 12, 2013

The Minds Behind 'Einstein On The Beach' Talk Shop

A scene from the revival of Einstein on the Beach.
Los Angeles Opera

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 12:15 pm

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Classical Spotlight
11:40 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Philip Glass, Searching South Of The Border

Orange Mountain Music

Among my fellow classical music fans, I’ve been a big defender of Philip Glass’s music over the years. I enjoy the way the composer plays with time and space in his music, the way each harmonic shift signifies a sea change in the structure of the piece. After a period of heavy experimentation in the 1970s, pushing the boundaries of concert music with “Music with Changing Parts” and his opera “Einstein on the Beach,” Glass refined his radical style, adding linear melodic lines to the musical building blocks that formed the basis of his minimalist language.

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