piano

Jonas Becker

Mischievous imaginary creatures populate the folklore of Norway, and they loom large in the music of Edvard Grieg, whose home was even named “Troldhaugen (Troll Hill).” From “Peer Gynt,” with its spooky “Mountain King” music, to the “Elves Dance” in Grieg’s “Lyric Pieces,” the composer drew on Norse folklore and folk melodies for his piano tunes, and even the majestic A minor concerto, probably his most famous work.

Esther Haase / Sony Music

Writing an artist bio is a thankless task. You have to list the subject's accomplishments, offer a brief history of their life and study, and maybe include an inspiring quote or two from the artist themselves. Usually, they're given a cursory read while you're waiting for a concert to begin, or maybe glanced at on a website. But in the age of Wikipedia, maybe it's time to spice up the artist bio. In fact, why not go for broke?

If there's one piece by Chopin that can truly be called "trippy," it's the Mazurka in A minor, Op. 17, No. 4 – especially in this spellbinding performance by pianist Pavel Kolesnikov. The young Russian has just released a new album of Chopin's Mazurkas, arranged not chronologically but by mood and texture, flowing like a mixtape.

Who Are The Amateurs At The Cliburn Competition?

Jun 23, 2016

color:#333333">All week long, Art&seek has been reporting on The Cliburn Amateur Competition in Fort Worth. 


color:#333333">Late this evening, we’ll find out who will make it to the semifinals. [We'll post the results here when we get them.] The competitors all have day jobs, but they also have a passion for piano. So we went down to the competition chat with a few of the folks vying for the top prize and learned that it takes countless hours of practice to call yourself a Cliburn amateur.

At this year’s San Antonio International Piano Competition, the five finalists were able to choose the repertoire they felt would best showcase their talents, but there was one piece they *had* to play, by Matthew Mason.

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