piano

When Oscar Paz Suaznabar plays the piano, he does so with feeling. The Alexandria, Va., resident has played at Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center and on the NPR show From the Top . He is 9 years old. Oscar started playing his older sister's keyboard by ear when he was just 2. The sorrow he conveys when he plays "The Lark" by Russian composer Mikhail Glinka is drawn from the kind of loss any 9-year-old can understand. "It reminds of when I lost my pet bunny. I named her Symphony," he tells NPR...

You wouldn't normally expect one of the great composers of the last few centuries to be meek, but how's this for humility? "Bach and Beethoven erected temples and churches on the heights. I only wanted to build dwellings for men in which they might feel happy, and at home." Those words are credited to Edvard Grieg . Pianist Stephen Hough has three — count them, three — new albums out right now. One features his own compositions, and two of them include music by Grieg, including 27 of the...

Twenty years ago, pianist András Schiff did not hide his disdain for the fortepiano — the smaller, quieter precursor to the modern grand piano. In the liner notes of five separate Schubert albums Schiff released in the early 1990s, he wrote: "Schubert's piano music has luckily not been discovered yet by specialists playing copies of Graf fortepianos ." And with that Schiff landed a double blow. Players of fortepianos were merely "specialists" — and they were clearly misguided in performing...

Nathan Cone / TPR

Hundreds of children in San Antonio and the surrounding area take private music lessons. If you, your child or grandchild is among them, there’s a good chance your teacher is part of the San Antonio Music Teachers Association (SAMTA). The group was founded one hundred years ago at the St. Anthony Hotel in downtown San Antonio, and on March 30, 2015, today’s members—and some of their talented students—gathered to celebrate the occasion with words and music. SAMTA provides “accountability and...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jivu8n5KRM It was in Carnegie Hall and Sviatoslav Richter was playing the piano. The floor rumbled and the walls shook. It happened during the tumultuous passage in double octaves that opens the fugato in Liszt 's Sonata in B minor. That the supernatural force I thought I experienced actually had a mundane subterranean source — the BMT's passage along the tracks underneath Carnegie — mattered not at all. I had fallen in love with the pianist five years earlier...

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