poetry

Marlon Lizama

Despite a strong Hispanic presence, not much Mexican-American history is being taught in public schools along the border — that is, until now.  

  • On this episode of Fronteras, students in El Paso are learning more about a previously unknown chapter of history (0:17).
  • Also on this episode, a SpaceX facility in Brownsville has yet to be completed but residents there are worried if the company’s promises of a launch facility will go unfulfilled (5:34).
  • And finally, Houston poet and performer Marley Lizama talks about how his mother’s unconventional punishments led him to poetry, and how hip hop helped him find his voice (10:57).


Marlon Lizama

Houston poet and performer Marlon “Marley” Lizama discovered his love of the spoken word through hip hop. His group Havikoro is made up of dancers, poets and authors, and they have traveled the world sharing their culture with international audiences.

Josue Vazquez

An international evening of dance, music and literature is planned for Wednesday night. Sponsored by Alianza Latinoamericana, the evening starts off with dance--specifically, the Tango. Don't know how to Tango? Josue Vazquez says not a problem.

"We will have a tango lesson--Argentine Tango lesson. My friend Manuel Lobo will be teaching the lesson. We have a large selection of tangos. It will be basic tango for people who never done it. If somebody is there has done it before, we can accommodate them, too."

For over 40 years Wings Press has publishing works of poetry – fiction and non-fiction. As a small and remarkable independent publisher it has fought to bring diverse voices into the world. Bryce Milligan has been the man behind the press for most of those years. Milligan is an accomplished writer himself and has recently published his own book of poetry “Take to the Highway.”

Milligan’s work is being celebrated at Bihl Haus Arts Saturday from 2 to 4 with An Afternoon with Bryce Milligan – along with a retrospective exhibit of his book design work.

The way Jimmy Santiago Baca tells it, poetry saved his life — but he's not speaking in hyperbole. Long before the poet won an American Book Award, Baca was in prison on a drug conviction, where he was facing down a prison-yard fight with another inmate.

Baca sought padding however he could get it.

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