Politics

Axiomphoto.net by Ternell Washington

On Fridays, we give you a preview of some of the weekend's most interesting events. This week, it's a little different, with an emphasis on the last event.  

First off, on Saturday at the Institute of Texan Cultures Buddhist monks are creating a community mandala out of colorful sands. It's called The Mystical Arts of Tibet, and promises to be both fascinating and beautiful. Then on Saturday night, Texas original Billy Joe Shaver is playing a great live outdoor venue outside of Boerne, the Round Up. 

From Texas Standard:

As Senate Republicans struggle to nail down the votes they need among their own ranks to pass a bill that would repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, many inside and outside the party are once again consider what it means to be loyal in the era of President Donald Trump. The conundrum has been around since the campaign, when revelations about Trump's actions and behavior kept many GOP members from embracing him fully.

Washington Post Reporter David Fahrenthold is a Houston native who earned a Pulitzer Prize for reporting on then-candidate Trump's claims about charitable giving. Fahrenthold also broke the story of the "Access Hollywood" tape, days before the election. He spoke with Host David Brown at the Texas Tribune Festival.

From Texas Standard:

An article by New Yorker staff writer and Texas resident Lawrence Wright makes the case that Texas is a political bellwether. In "America's Future Is Texas," Wright argues that, indeed, as Texas goes, so goes the nation — politically speaking, at any rate.

From Texas Standard:

As the U.S. becomes increasingly divided along party lines, many are losing faith in the American political system. ABC News analyst and Texas resident Matthew Dowd says that despite current partisan struggles, trust in the system can be restored. He explores the topic in his new book, “A New Way: Embracing the Paradox as we Lead and Serve.”

 

A Bexar County judge this afternoon ruled in favor of outgoing Sheriff Susan Pamerleau who was challenging a restraining order obtained by Sheriff-Elect Javier Salazar.

 

Salazar- who takes office Sunday - claimed Pamerleau is making personnel changes in her final days on the job to protect positions of some county employees who supported her.

 

Pamerleau and her attorney argued the personnel changes were legal and that she followed state statutes and county policies. 

 

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