Politics

Texas Tribune

Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona is considered the father of the modern Conservative movement. He was a straight shooter who firmly believed in rugged individualism and small government. He opposed civil rights - because he was concerned about Federal Government overreach - which is why he supported abortion rights. 

Goldwater ran for president in 1964 and was beaten in a landslide by Lyndon Johnson. We didn't see another strong conservative rise like Goldwater until 1980 with Ronald Reagan, but Reagan won and changed the face of American politics. 

 

Early voting begins today for Texas’ Super Tuesday primary. In the presidential races voters will be choosing delegates to the Republican and Democratic conventions. They’ll also be choosing their parties’ nominees in local, state and congressional races.

 

In south San Antonio, members of two long-time political families are again facing off for the Democratic nomination in Texas House District 118.  They’re hoping their names will matter.

 

The Texas Tribune

Editor's note: This story has been updated with additional comment.

Republican John Lujan defeated Democrat Tomas Uresti in a special election runoff Tuesday in Texas House District 118 in San Antonio.

With 100% of precincts counted, Lujan had 52.38 percent to Uresti’s 47.62 percent. The margin of victory was 171 votes out of 3,601 cast, with a voter turnout of just 4.12 percent. As of late Tuesday night, Lujan’s campaign said Uresti had not yet called to concede the race.

Ryan E. Poppe

The Texas House again becomes a battleground early next year. Not between Democrats and Republicans, but instead establishment GOP and Tea Party challengers.

In as many as 30 races Tea Party newcomers are trying the right-flank of members they believe don't represent their brand of conservatism in Texas. Even the head of the Texas House, Speaker Joe Straus isn't immune. One of Texas' most influential conservatives has two rightward challengers for the Alamo Heights/San Antonio seat.

Photo illustration by Emily Albracht / The Texas Tribune

It’s odd that one officeholder could be convicted, exonerated, re-indicted, convicted and sentenced without completely endangering his political career while another could get knocked out of contention while blaming an indictment that has not yet taken him to trial. 

But that’s politics.

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