Pope Francis

Pope Francis says it is wrong to equate violence with Islam, adding that "I do not believe that it is true or right that Islam is terrorist."

On a flight back to the Vatican after a five-day visit to Poland, Francis was asked by a reporter about remarks he made following last week's attack on a church in northern France in which an elderly priest was brutally murdered. The reporter asked the pope why he refers to terrorists but never to Islam when talking about such violent incidents.

Pope Francis told a gathering of about 900 heads of women's religious orders that he supports studying whether women can become deacons. The step is seen as a possible turning point for the Roman Catholic Church, which does not allow women to serve in ordained ministry.

At Thursday's meeting of the International Union of Superiors General, Francis was asked why women are not allowed to be deacons and whether he would form an official commission to look into the issue. He responded, "I accept; it would be useful for the church to clarify this question. I agree."

When Pope Francis travels to the Greek island of Lesbos on Saturday, he will likely bring with him a sharp rebuke for Europe's response to the migrant crisis.

"The commandment 'Thou shalt not kill' has absolute value and concerns both the innocent and the guilty," Pope Francis said Sunday, urging that the death penalty be abolished.

Ivan Pierre Aguirre / Texas Tribune

This week on Fronteras: 

--Pope Francis travels a migrant’s path in Mexico, ending up in Ciudad Juarez, a city where some have felt hopeless.  

--In New Mexico, Native Americans finally are regaining some of their conquered ancestral lands.

--Texas Republicans are worried about winning their share of the Latino presidential primary vote on Super Tuesday.

-- A San Diego program serves as a catalyst, encouraging immigrant parents to finish their education.

--Racial slurs prompt Texas A&M officials to apologize to some Dallas students.

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