Pope Francis

Catholic bishops and other representatives of the world's more than 1 billion Roman Catholics are meeting in Rome on Sunday for the start of the Synod on the Family. This meeting will guide Church teaching on issues like marriage, divorce and contraception.

Responding to a flood of interest in the surprise revelation that Pope Francis met with controversial county clerk Kim Davis, the Vatican says the event shouldn't be seen as an endorsement of all of Davis' views. Davis has refused to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples in Rowan County, Ky.

Davis was one of "several dozen" people the pope met at the end of his visit to Washington, D.C., the Vatican says.

This week on Fronteras: 

--Pope Francis makes an historic visit to America – entering as a migrant.  San Antonio Catholics react to his speech addressing a joint session of Congress.

--How much influence does Pope Francis have?  A fellow Argentinean mother hopes he can help her son, a convicted murderer, get off on death row.

--A memorial honoring families torn apart by deportation goes up near the California-Mexico border.

Pope Francis' second day in New York continues with a visit to Our Lady Queen of Angels School in East Harlem, followed by a motorcade ride through central park at 5 p.m. Afterwards, he will celebrate a mass at 6 p.m. in Madison Square Garden.

Earlier in the day, the pontiff addressed the United Nations General Assembly, advising the assembled global leaders to put humanity before partisan interests.

Shelley Kofler / Texas Public Radio

At St. Mary’s University devout Catholics joined Americans from around the nation in watching Pope Francis address a joint session of Congress. St. Mary’s is one of three Catholic universities in San Antonio, where Catholics are by far the largest religious group. In Bexar County more than 30 percent of residents identify as Catholic.