Poverty

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

Each semester since last summer, the University of Texas Health Science Center has been giving students an extra dose of the real world. Rather than relying on books and tests to educate nursing and medical students, professors thought a “day in the life” of someone living in poverty might help them relate to patients better.

The exercise is what they call a "poverty simulator" and attempts to portray real situations of people on restricted incomes.

When President Lyndon B. Johnson met at the White House with the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. on Jan. 18, 1964, the two men were near the peak of their powers and the country was in a maelstrom.

LBJ Library photo by Cecil Stoughton

Fifty years ago last night, President Lyndon Baines Johnson called on lawmakers to help him wage a war on poverty. Few would argue that poverty is still a large issue today, but the effectiveness of the programs launched -- programs like Medicare, Medicaid, food stamps, Job Corps, etc. -- are widely debated depending on what party you identify with.

Today we talk about the legacy of the program with a variety of scholars.

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For LBJ, The War On Poverty Was Personal

Jan 8, 2014

President Lyndon Johnson stood in the Capitol on Jan. 8, 1964, and, in his first State of the Union address, committed the nation to a war on poverty.

"We shall not rest until that war is won," Johnson said. "The richest nation on Earth can afford to win it. We cannot afford to lose it."

It was an effort that had been explored under President Kennedy, but it firmly — and quickly — took shape under Johnson.

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