presidential campaign

5 Ways Jeb Bush’s 2016 Campaign Runs Through Texas

Jun 16, 2015
The Texas Tribune

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, fresh off making his presidential campaign official, will likely waste no time putting in face time with voters in Iowa and New Hampshire. But Texas, the state central to his family's political DNA, will never be too far removed from his White House ambitions.   

As he wades into the 2016 race, Bush has perhaps the deepest ties to Texas besides the two hopefuls who currently call it home: former Gov. Rick Perry and U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz. Bush is helped by famous family spread throughout the Lone Star State, a biography in which Texas has a starring role, fundraising efforts targeted at the state's deep-pocketed donors and an appeal to Texas' growing Hispanic population.

Updated at 1:00 p.m. ET

Rick Perry, the former governor of Texas and 2012 Republican candidate for president, formally announced a second bid for the White House.

At a rally in Addison, Texas, this afternoon, Perry told a group of supporters: "Today I am announcing that I'm running for the presidency of the United States of America."

He decried that "weakness at home has led to weakness abroad" and that "Our economy is barely growing."

An Announcement On ‘The’ Announcement: Bush Decision On June 15

Jun 4, 2015
Gage Skidmore / CC

WASHINGTON — Jeb Bush is giving a strong indication that he’ll join the ever-expanding Republican presidential campaign field later this month, announcing Thursday morning that his decision will come on June 15 in Miami.

The former Florida governor, widely expected to run for the Republican nomination, wrote “coming soon” on Twitter with a link to the website jebannouncement.com.

On that page, the date 06.15.15 was listed, followed by the tease, “BE THE FIRST TO KNOW. RSVP NOW!” Bush also tweeted it in Spanish, “Próximamente 6.15.15.”

“My expectation, my hope is I’ll be a candidate,” Bush said earlier in the week, while attending an economic forum in Florida with other 2016 GOP prospects.

Doug Gansler / CC

WASHINGTON — Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz is apologizing for cracking a joke at Vice President Joe Biden’s expense even as Biden mourns the death of his son.

During an appearance Wednesday in Howell, Michigan, Cruz rattled off a Biden line he’s been using in speeches on the stump.

In the joke, Cruz pokes fun at Biden’s occasionally controversial remarks and tells his audience that one need only mention Biden’s name to get people to laugh.

“Vice President Joe Biden. You know the nice thing? You don’t need a punchline,” the Texas senator said at a GOP dinner.

“I promise you it works. The next party you’re at, just walk up to someone and say, ‘Vice President Joe Biden’ and just close your mouth. They will crack up laughing,” he said.

His audience laughed  but by Thursday morning, Cruz used his Facebook account to say he was sorry.

In his post, the Texas senator said, “It was a mistake to use an old joke about Joe Biden during his time of grief, and I sincerely apologize.”

SEIU Walk a Day in My Shoes 2008 / Wikimedia Commons

WASHINGTON — Seeking an expansion of voting rights, Hillary Rodham Clinton plans to call for an early voting period of at least 20 days in every state and push back against Republican-led states that have sought restrictions on voting access.

The Democratic presidential candidate is speaking Thursday at Texas Southern University in Houston, a historically black university. Democrats have filed legal challenges to voting changes from GOP lawmakers in the presidential battleground states of Ohio and Wisconsin.

Clinton’s campaign said she intends to denounce voting restrictions in North Carolina, Texas, Florida and Wisconsin and encourage states to adopt a new national standard of no fewer than 20 days of early in-person voting, including weekend and evening voting.

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