presidential campaign

Ryan E. Poppe / Texas Public Radio

The third time's the charm.

That's the view of a new super PAC that wants former Gov. Rick Perry to re-enter the 2016 presidential race — the same one he dropped out of more than two months ago. The group, Bring Leadership Back PAC, launched Tuesday with the goal of showing Perry there is still ample support for him among Republican primary voters, even if his second bid for the White House did not go according to plan. 

By Cooper Neill/Bob Daemmrich / The Texas Tribune

*Correction appended.

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, is facing increasing scrutiny for his vote five months ago to place new limits on national intelligence programs, legislation that is being cast in a new light following deadly terrorist attacks in Paris. 

This post was updated at 9:23 p.m. ET

The next president will have to make some very big decisions about how to combat terrorism.

Paris, Beirut and the bombing of a Russian jetliner make that abundantly clear, 14 years after Sept. 11, the worst terrorist attacks on American soil. To listen to the presidential candidates, however, is to listen to two very distinctly different worldviews.

"Front-runner" can be a tenuous word. But when it comes to at least one group, Hillary Clinton is far and away the leader — the Democratic Party establishment.

There's no better measure of that establishment than unpledged party leaders and elected official delegates, better known as "superdelegates."

Among this group, Clinton leads Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders 359 to 8, according to an AP survey of the group that will help elect the nominee at the Democratic National Convention in July. Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley has two people supporting him from this group.

The fourth debate among the leading Republican candidates for president filled the historic Milwaukee Theatre with cheers, laughter and occasional boos, but it probably did not alter the dynamics among the eight featured contestants.

No one seemed to stumble or scintillate so notably as to change the pecking order with the first voting, now fewer than a dozen weeks away in the Iowa precinct caucuses.