presidential campaign

Joey Palacios

One week from today Iowa voters cast the first ballots in the presidential contests.  In just five weeks Texans go to the polls on Super Tuesday, March 1. 

This morning NPR’s Mara Liasson reports nationally on the anger and anxiety felt by many Americans.

Texas Public Radio reports on the mood in our community by talking with voters in San Antonio and Boerne.  Do Texans feel economically secure?  Have recent terrorism events made us more fearful and vulnerable?

This week, NPR and some member stations will be taking the temperature of the electorate in communities around the country. You can follow those stations, via Twitter, here.

The mood of the voters is one of the most important political factors in an election year. This year voters are anxious, frightened and angry.

Candidates in both parties are trying to show they get it.

Hillary Clinton walks a daily tightrope between attacking Republicans and trumpeting her ability to work with them. Republicans "seem to be very fact averse," she told me in an interview, shortly after saying "I'm interested in us solving problems together."

Hillary Clinton dismissed a report that emails she sent on her private email server contained a high level of classified material.

Speaking to NPR's Ari Shapiro in San Antonio on Wednesday, the Democratic presidential candidate continued to maintain that she "never sent or received any material marked classified" while at the State Department "and that hasn't changed in all of these months."

Four years ago, the Iowa caucuses were very, very good to former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum.

In a race where seemingly every Republican candidate took a turn at the head of the polls, Santorum peaked at just the right time. He won a razor-thin race in Iowa, proclaimed "game on" to a caucus-night crowd, and went on to be 2012's GOP runner-up.

Things are different this time for the 2012 caucus victor.

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