Prop. 6 Water Fund

Texas voters approved all nine state constitutional amendments on the November ballot.

The issue that received the most attention was Proposition 6. It creates a new water fund with two billion dollars from the state’s Rainy Day fund.

Propositions 1 and 4 cut property taxes for disabled veterans or their surviving spouse.

Ryan Poppe / TPR News

The League of Women Voters in Texas is urging a "yes" vote on Prop. 6, the constitutional amendment that will take $2 billion from the state's Rainy Day Fund to create a sort of bank account to fund water projects.

The League of Women Voters is a non-partisan group that works to get people to become active in their government and to get out the vote. It does not support one candidate or party over others, but does take positions on issues.

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

Update (11/5): Today is Election Day and voting locations are different from early voting so make sure and pay close attention to your voting precinct. Polls close at 7 p.m.

Flickr user irishk / cc

In the first segment:

On Saturday, downtown San Antonio will be filled with an estimated 1,000 armed men and women espousing their right to carry openly rifles and shotguns. "Come and Take It San Antonio!" has billed itself as a peaceful march and open carry event at the site of the Alamo.  

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

A coalition of people from multiple political backgrounds are calling for Texans to vote "no" on Prop. 6, the plan that is being promoted by a bipartisan group of state legislators and Gov. Rick Perry as the solution to the state's water problems.

Voters will see the measure on the ballot starting next Monday when early voting begins and Election Day in Nov. 5.

If passed, the plan set into motion by Prop. 6 will move $2 billion from the state's Rainy Day Fund to the Texas Water Development Board to be used for loans on water projects.