Religion

AARON SCHRANK/TPR

There’s plenty of skeletal imagery around this week, but one bony figure showing up more in South Texas has little to do with Halloween or Dia de Los Muertos. She’s Santa Muerte, or ‘Saint Death,’ a Mexican folk saint condemned by the Catholic Church. Devotion to the skeleton saint is growing quickly—even in San Antonio. 

Ana Maya’s San Antonio home is filled with images of Santa Muerte, from posters and jewelry to the several dozen statues she uses for her spiritual work.

“People know me as Brujita Maya la Santa Muerte, and I pray and devote to Santa Muerte,” Maya says.

Dare To Listen: Three Wise Guys & A Gal

Oct 31, 2016

Differences between religious beliefs are often all too apparent. But what can people of different faiths agree on? What ideas might bring them together? 

In this hour-long conversation, four San Antonio faith leaders share their experiences finding common purpose with people outside of their own religions. A local rabbi, priest, imam and pastor discuss challenges to interfaith dialogue, explain why it's important to their ministry and point to San Antonio issues that a multi-faith coalition could help solve. 

 

Panelists:

Tuesday night, observant Jews around the world attended Kol Nidrei, the evening service which marked the start of Yom Kippur.  Yom Kippur, the holiest of Jewish holidays, is the Day of Atonement.

Yom Kippur is the last of the 10-day period when Jews pray that they will be written into the Book of Life for another year. They also ask for forgiveness from family and friends. 

Has the West become obsessed with capitalism, material possession, and making money? Most people in the U.S. would probably say yes. But have we built a religion around the Free Market, imbued it with certain magical qualities that can only be truly explained through interpretive acolytes? That is the argument that renown religious scholar Harvey Cox makes in his new book "The Market As God."

Guest:

  • Harvey Cox, Hollis Professor of Divinity at Harvard University

The highway can be a lonely place for truck drivers, who often travel long distances for days and weeks without seeing family and friends. But an organization called Truckstop Ministries offers a sanctuary for tired drivers to reflect, rest and pray.

Saul Gonzalez of Here & Now contributor KCRW in Los Angeles paid a visit to a truck stop church off Interstate 10 in southern California and has our story.

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