Rio Grande Valley

Daniela Pastrana/IPS / Flickr: https://flic.kr/p/9cMmiv

·         Mexican Journalist Marcela Turati takes risks reporting on the drug wars.

·         North Texas resident Lindsay Diaz was underinsured when a tornado hit.  That’s made rebuilding more difficult.

·         A nature trail brings relief to a distressed New Mexico neighborhood.

·         Houston Symphony Orchestra members are helping bilingual students adapt English words through music.

John Burnett / NPR

This week on Fronteras:

•          A federal task force has moved into the Rio Grande Valley to investigate long-standing political corruption. 

•          NPR’s John Burnett talks to Texas Public Radio about the origins of the federal corruption probe, including concerns that businesses will not bring economic development to the region as long as the corruption is so widespread.

•          Teens living on both sides of the border near San Diego are tackling issues affected young Hispanics, including high school dropout rates and unemployment.

This week, NPR examines public corruption in South Texas. The FBI has launched a task force to clean up entrenched wrongdoing by public servants in the Rio Grande Valley. In the final part of this series, we examine vote-stealing and election fraud.

This week, NPR examines public corruption in South Texas. The FBI has launched a task force to clean up entrenched misconduct by public officials in the Rio Grande Valley. In this installment of the series, we hear from a police officer who became a drug dealer.

In the Rio Grande Valley of Texas, where people are accustomed to seeing public officials led away in handcuffs, the case of the Panama Unit shocked everyone. The Valley's celebrated anti-narcotics squad had gone to the dark side.

This week, NPR examines public corruption in South Texas. The FBI has launched a task force to clean up pervasive misconduct by public servants in the Rio Grande Valley. But as NPR's John Burnett and Marisa Penaloza report, the problems are entrenched.

The Rio Grande Valley of Texas is a world apart, isolated by empty ranch land to the north, the Gulf to the east, and Mexico to the south. A million-and-a-half people live there amid dazzling wealth and stark poverty.

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