Rio Grande Valley

From Texas Standard:

Selene Moreno is a senior at Benito Juarez-Abraham Lincoln High School in La Joya, Texas. She says she’s looking forward to graduation.

“I’m planning to become a physical therapist after I graduate from high school and I’m planning on going to Texas A&M,” Moreno says.

On this Labor Day, a look back to 50 years ago – a labor fight, a strike and a legendary march for better wages, improved working conditions and human dignity for farm workers.

On June 1, 1966, farm workers in Starr County in the Rio Grande Valley, virtually all of them Latino, left the melon fields.

They did the unimaginable and went on strike.

They were demanding a $25 dollar-an-hour wage, and improved working conditions, including clean drinking water.

Daniela Pastrana/IPS / Flickr: https://flic.kr/p/9cMmiv

·         Mexican Journalist Marcela Turati takes risks reporting on the drug wars.

·         North Texas resident Lindsay Diaz was underinsured when a tornado hit.  That’s made rebuilding more difficult.

·         A nature trail brings relief to a distressed New Mexico neighborhood.

·         Houston Symphony Orchestra members are helping bilingual students adapt English words through music.

John Burnett / NPR

This week on Fronteras:

•          A federal task force has moved into the Rio Grande Valley to investigate long-standing political corruption. 

•          NPR’s John Burnett talks to Texas Public Radio about the origins of the federal corruption probe, including concerns that businesses will not bring economic development to the region as long as the corruption is so widespread.

•          Teens living on both sides of the border near San Diego are tackling issues affected young Hispanics, including high school dropout rates and unemployment.

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