River Walk

Fiesta Commission

The  history of Fiesta continues this week. The 124-year-old San Antonio tradition has changed but only little when compared to the dramatic changes to the surrounding city.

We talk with Lewis Fisher about Fiesta, a changing San Antonio and more.

Jack Morgan

He’s made a lifestyle and a living writing about San Antonio history, and in particular, its river. I'm talking about Lewis Fisher. He wrote the definitive book years ago on the history of the San Antonio River, but now he’s got a new one.

“The new book is titled American Venice: The Epic Story of San Antonio’s River.

So why did we need a new book about the river?

“The River Walk has recently been expanded from three miles to 15 miles, with dramatic extensions to the north and to the south. And this book covers both of them.”

Elizabeth Lyons

A new River Walk art installation went in last week. The piece is called Compass Rose.

“Compass Rose is a 4 ft. by 3 ft. glazed ceramic mosaic that is situated in the geographic center of San Antonio on the River Walk,” said Alex Rubio, the Blue Star Contemporary Art Museum’s Artist in Residence for their mosaic program.

As Rubio detailed, the mosaic program mentors high school students that they recruit from art programs all around the city.

“Teaching them studio practicum. Getting them involved in community work, and of course, public art,” Rubio said.

Eileen Pace

  You may have noticed an increasing number of yellow ribbons along the River Walk in the past couple of weeks. People have been buying sponsorship ribbons to honor loved ones in advance of the third annual Armed Forces River Parade on Saturday evening, a parade that is considered unique in the country.

Janie and Randy Kiehl drive down from Kerrville every year to help Paseo del Rio hang hundreds of large yellow bows on the trees along the River Walk in preparation for the parade.

Alamo Photographic

The Briscoe Western Art Museum just added another gallery and this one is outdoors. The grand opening of the one-third acre McNutt Courtyard on the east end of the Briscoe’s Market Street museum on Thursday morning unveiled eight western sculptures.

I spoke to the museum’s Executive Director Steven Karr about the process for finding the sculptures.

“It was really trying to find pieces that were emblematic of the American West,” Karr said.

Emblematic, but, Karr hopes, not necessarily what you’d expect.

Pages