robotics

Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

E-commerce has spurred more warehouses, according to Moody Analytics. It predicted the growth rate for modern "infill" warehouse space nationwide will be twice that of office space next year. And more warehouses mean more workers to pack and sort those boxes.


Whether you play an instrument, sing or sculpt, "everyone does some kind of art," Pindar Van Arman says.

A few years ago, the Defense Department invited researchers from around the world to build robots that could respond to disasters. The machines were supposed to go up stairs, drive a car and clear debris.

The competition to test the robots was last week. For many of the robots, it did not go well.

On Friday, 24 robots and their masters will be going head-to-head in California for a $2 million prize. The robotics challenge is sponsored by the Pentagon's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

Those fearing the Pentagon-sponsored prize could signal the dawn of Terminator-style cyborgs needn't worry. "Even though they look like us, and they may look a little bit mean, there's really nothing inside," says Gill Pratt, the program manager running this competition. "What you're really seeing is a puppet."

Think Science: Robotics

May 31, 2015

    

    

We're still a ways away from C-3PO, but advances in robotics are benefiting society beyond the assembly line. This Think Science presentation shares some of the recent trends in the robotics industry. You'll learn about how robotics programs like FIRST are benefiting San Antonio-area kids, and about advancements in innovative automation and robotics solutions.

Panelists:

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