SAFD

Shelley Kofler / Texas Public Radio

UPDATE Friday, 1:00 pm:  Firefighters from around the state have gathered at the Community Bible Church on Loop 1604 for a solemn ceremony honoring fallen firefighter Scott Deem.

Louisa Jonas / Texas Public Radio

San Antonio Fire Chief Charles Hood says the fire that killed firefighter Scott Deem at a northwest strip mall last week was one of the worst fires in the history of the department.  Several hundred firefighters responded.  Fire investigators are still looking for the cause.

 

Chief Hood says investigators don’t yet know what caused the fatal fire. He says it’s too early to determine if any policies will need to be changed due to the fire and death of 31-year-old Scott Deem.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

San Antonio’s police and fire fighter’s unions are claiming victory in the 10-year evergreen clause lawsuit after a judge ruled in their favor in a motion for summary judgment. Both unions took to the steps of City Hall asking the city to drop the appeal

 

Surrounded by both members of both unions, San Antonio Police Association President Mike Helle said if Mayor Ivy Taylor makes a public statement dropping the lawsuit against the evergreen clause both unions will be back to the table in 30 days.

 

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The San Antonio City Council has approved a retroactive ordinance requiring 36 to 48 high rise buildings in the city to retrofit with fire sprinklers. These identified buildings were built before a 1982 ordinance requiring them.  San Antonio Fire Chief Charles Hood says the building owners will have 12 years to comply.

 

Virginia Alvino / Texas Public Radio News

  The San Antonio Fire Department says weekend rain resulted in only 6 high water rescue calls. While one man was swept into a storm drain Saturday, he survived the incident.

Fire Chief Charles Hood says while rainfall was less than expected, the number of rescue calls the department received was down significantly from severe weather events in the past.

Hood says that’s partially because the public, and the department, knew the storm was coming.

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