Chris Eudaily / TPR

Nearly 300 Edison High School students got hands-on experience with triage and search-and-rescue on Monday morning. A simulated school bus "explosion" was part of a four-hour training exercise at the Public Safety Magnet school. The students played the role of first responders.

It's a scenario that no one wants to see happen: An I.E.D. explodes on an SAISD school bus, injuring several dozen students--followed by a second blast a few minutes later.

Stuart Seal / The Fiesta Commission

Fiesta gets underway tomorrow and the Boston Marathon bombings have San Antonio police and firefighters strengthening their presence to make sure people stay safe during the 11-day celebration.

Fiesta is San Antonio's way to honor the heroes of the Alamo and Battle of San Jacinto and it all started in 1891 with a hugely successful Battle of Flowers Parade.

Though the years since have been full of fun and festivities, there was one incident that changed everything.

Ryan Loyd / TPR

Arson investigators are looking into a two-alarm fire that engulfed a vacant building downtown last night. More than 100 firefighters worked to put out the flames near a hotel at Third and Broadway.

Firefighters battled stubborn flames for hours with gallons of water flowing onto the street below making it look more like the Riverwalk.

"We arrived to find heavy smoke coming from the second floor," said District Fire Chief Keith Crusius, who said people at the nearby Travelers Hotel self-evacuated.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The San Antonio Fire Department held an open house to the media this week to detail what it does to determine whether or not a fire is considered an act of arson.

The fire department has 17 arson investigators, who the past two years have been called out to more than 1,200 fires.  Captain Chris Casals, with the San Antonio Fire Department's Arson Bureau, said his division exists to determine the cause and origin of a fire.

San Antonio Light Collection - UTSA Libraries Special Collections

Once upon a time, San Antonio firefighters collected toys for children of the city; they even painted and fixed them. They called their drive Toy Day, and gave children who brought toys free movie tickets.

Researchers at the Institute of Texan Cultures found pictures of Toy Day tucked away in archives, and leaders decided to rekindle the old tradition, but give it a new spin. Now in its second year, history has proven to bring back what once was a thriving act of kindness: providing children with happiness.