Chris Eudaily / TPR News

This year more than 52 million cars were recalled. This means that one in five cars being driven today have had a recall. Toyota, Chrysler, General Motors--and the list goes on--have helped smash the record for recalled vehicles in a year.

American Association of Poison Control Centers


San Antonio doctors are noticing an increase of eye injuries in small children after they come into contact with laundry detergent pods.

Physicians at University Hospital are concerned that they haven’t yet seen the worst of the injuries.

Liquid detergent held inside colorful, squishy plastic packets are sometimes irresistible for kids.

Dr. Jorge Montes, Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the UT Health Science Center, said the Emergency Room has seen a string of children since this summer, all under the age of five, with serious burns on the eye.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Internet safety has become the new "stranger danger" among middle school students. This week, Google gave a lesson to students at Vale Middle School on how to secure their information, and protect themselves from involuntarily going viral with an embarrassing images or videos. The company's Online Safety Roadshow is designed to teach kids the risks of weak passwords, giving out too much information, and sharing photos. Google spokeswoman Jamie Hill says the pre-teen and early teen years are the best ages to target students for online safety.

Steve Baker "kennethkonica" / cc

Last week San Antonio Police Chief William McManus pitched city council an ordinance rewrite that would allow police to ticket people who give to panhandlers on San Antonio streets.

Support in council is divided on the proposal; some see it as a freedom of speech issue, while others note high complaints about panhandlers from constituents. 

City of San Antonio

The debate is heating up over San Antonio Police Chief William McManus' proposal to tighten the city's panhandling ordinance.

The issue, which was presented to the council's public safety committee in early September, will again be heard by the same committee in October. But it's not being received well by some sitting members of the committee.

District 9 Councilman Joe Krier believes that the ordinance may be at odds with freedom of speech and that people can express their right to give a buck to someone if they want.