safety

ACLU

A grandfather who died on the floor of his own home, the result of a misfire, a mother who was shot while holding her infant son, a new study from the American Civil Liberties Union highlights tragedies that have happened when Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) teams are used for incidents once thought of as outside of their scope.

The study identifies a high percentage of times when the use of SWAT teams was superflous -- 62% were for drug searches in a 2011 and 2012. 

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

A boarding home owner is settling out of court with the city to repair a home with dozens of code compliance problems.

The home is in the 1100 block of Pasadena, just off Blanco, north of downtown.

Matt, the home's maintenance man, is frustrated. He has paid to take care of this boarding home and the residents. He needs the tools to do his job but hasn't gotten them. The grass has never been this high, he said.

Matt spoke from just inside the gate of the home, which had a "Private Property" and "No Trespassing" sign on it.

R. LOYD: "Is it nice inside?"

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Senior citizens and families who need some cool air this summer are receiving help from Project Cool, an effort to distribute box fans throughout San Antonio.

As the summer months begin, San Antonians are looking for ways to beat the heat. Project Cool began 19 years ago between Catholic Charities, the San Antonio Fire Department, St. Vincent de Paul and other organizations. Catholic Charities President Antonio Fernandez said as the program kicks off, 20-inch box fans are needed.

New York City Department of Transportation / cc

A new report out from the National Complete Streets Coalition highlights nearly 50,000 walking deaths in 10 years with hundreds of thousands injured. The report titled Dangerous By Design 2014 lists San Antonio as 18th most dangerous city to walk in. 

Texas DPS

Texas cities damaged by various disasters in the last five years still qualify for billions of dollars in federal aid, but an official with the Texas Division of Emergency Management testified before state lawmakers this week that the state needs to do a better job getting and using that money.

Chief W. Nim Kidd, the head of the Texas Division of Emergency Management, told the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Rural Affairs and Homeland Security that one of the areas in need of improvements is how to get counties affected by a disaster the federal money they need to rebuild.

Pages