same-sex marriage

Rolando Briseno

A popular piece of public art has new meaning today for its San Antonio creator. That creator is Rolando Briseno, whose resume says he’s not just an artist, he’s also this.

“A cultural adjuster.”

He knows a lot about the South Texas culture, but twenty-four years ago, he actually lived elsewhere.

“In 1991 I was living in New York and I got a call from the Order of Alhambra, which is part of the Knights of Columbus.”

From Texas Standard:

The Supreme Court issued a 5-4 ruling in favor of same-sex marriage today. All 50 states are now required to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

Ronald “Ronnie” Macklin and his partner, Fritz Johnson-Macklin, are one of those couples. From the Austin suburb of Pflugerville, Ronnie joined Texas Standard to talk about his family’s story –  just minutes after learning about the Supreme Court decision.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson is broadcasting today from Texas, the biggest state in the country that had not yet legalized same-sex marriage.

Right now, there is a lot of action at courthouses across the state, as gay and lesbian couples rush in to get marriage licenses. Joey Palacios, a reporter at Texas Public Radio, is at the courthouse in San Antonio and describes the scene.

The Supreme Court has decided that state same-sex marriage bans are unconstitutional, legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide.

In a set of cases grouped under Obergefell v. Hodges, the high court ruled, 5-4, that states have to license same-sex marriages, as well as recognize same-sex marriages from other states. All four dissenting justices wrote dissents.

Updated at 11:49 a.m. ET

The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that states cannot keep same-sex couples from marrying and must recognize their unions. Those dissenting were the court's four conservative justices: Chief Justice John Roberts, Justice Antonin Scalia, Justice Clarence Thomas and Justice Samuel Alito.

Roberts' Rationale