same-sex marriage

The Supreme Court has decided that state same-sex marriage bans are unconstitutional, legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide.

In a set of cases grouped under Obergefell v. Hodges, the high court ruled, 5-4, that states have to license same-sex marriages, as well as recognize same-sex marriages from other states. All four dissenting justices wrote dissents.

Updated at 11:49 a.m. ET

The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that states cannot keep same-sex couples from marrying and must recognize their unions. Those dissenting were the court's four conservative justices: Chief Justice John Roberts, Justice Antonin Scalia, Justice Clarence Thomas and Justice Samuel Alito.

Roberts' Rationale

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WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court declared Friday that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the United States.

Gay and lesbian couples already can marry in 36 states and the District of Columbia. The court’s 5-4 ruling means the remaining 14 states, in the South and Midwest, will have to stop enforcing their bans on same-sex marriage. The outcome is the culmination of two decades of Supreme Court litigation over marriage, and gay rights generally.

UT-TT Poll: Texans Divided on Gay Marriage By Gender, Religion, Politics

Jun 24, 2015
Emily Albracht / The Texas Tribune

Texas voters are split on whether gays and lesbians should be allowed to marry and on whether businesses should be required to provide services to them, according to the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll. 

Ahead of an impending U.S. Supreme Court decision on legal challenges to same-sex marriage bans, Texas voters — by a narrow margin — said gay and lesbian couples should be allowed to wed. But neither side of the question drew a majority of the support, and 14 percent said they don’t know which way the court should rule. 

David Martin Davies / TPR News

A poll conducted by the University of Texas shows Texans view on legalizing same-sex marriage remains narrowly divided, even in the wake of a US Supreme Court decision that could reverse the state ban on gay marriage.  

The study, conducted by UT-Austin and the Texas Tribune suggests that peoples view on gay marriage is changing but just at a much slower pace when compared to other states with similar bans.  Professor Jim Henson heads up UT’s Texas Politics Project.

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