San Antonio 4

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Try to imagine serving a decade or longer in prison for a crime you did not commit. Maybe you are even on death row. Try to put yourself in that situation. For some people they don't have to imagine it... they lived it.

Paul Flahive

Yesterday, the "San Antonio Four" cleared another hurdle in trying to clear their names. Kristie Mayhugh, Cassie Rivera, Anna Vasquez, and Liz Ramirez - the women dubbed the "San Antonio Four" were relieved to get the news from state district judge Pat Priest that their case would be going to the Texas Court Of Criminal Appeals with a recommendation for a new trial.

However, Judge Priest, who is the same judge that sentenced three of them to more than a decade in prison stopped short of saying the women should receive the new trial based on their actual innocence.

Paul Flahive, Texas Public Radio

Four women continue their push for exoneration in the case that sent them to prison for more than a decade for a crime they say never took place.

The San Antonio Four, as the media took to calling them, is made up of Kristie Mayhugh, Anna Vasquez, Cassandra Rivera, and Elizabeth Ramirez.

They go before an evidentiary hearing Wednesday that will determine whether they go to the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals. They will again make their case again that they committed no crime. 

Roscoe Ellis (Flickr User: arellis49)

In the first segment:

The National Center for Reason and Justice is saying Fran Keller, who was incarcerated 20 years ago in a bizarre ritual abuse case in her Austin daycare center, is going to be freed as early as this afternoon to await the decision of the Court of Criminal Appeals on whether or not a retrial is necessary.

Paul Flahive / TPR News

In an at times emotional press conference this morning, Kristie Mayhugh, Anna Vasquez, Elizabeth Ramirez and Cassandra Rivera, also known as the San Antonio 4, talked about what it meant to them to finally be free after more than a decade in prison.

Elizabeth Ramirez was 20 years old and pregnant when she was first arrested.

"For me it was -- I got to finally hear my son for the first time say, 'Mom, I love you,'" Ramirez said.