San Antonio River Authority

Joey Palacios / TPR

San Antonio was spared the full force of Hurricane Harvey, leading locals to ask the question: What would have happened if the storm hit closer to home? 

The Texas Hill Country is already referred to as "Flash Flood Alley," prone to retaining water after excessive rain.

San Antonio River Authority

A nightly downtown event is both one of the city's most remarkable and one of its least known. During the warm months, if you look skyward at I-35 and Camden Streets, a certain sight will take your breath away.

We’ve been looking at the San Pedro Creek Project from north to south, and now we’re down to its last section, called Campo Abajo, or the Lower Field. This stretch goes from Guadalupe Street to South Alamo.

"There’s already economic development happening," said San Antonio River Authority’s Suzanne Scott about the area. "The new Kipp Academy is going to be located in this stretch and we’ve already been in conversations with them about having educational opportunities for the kids."

San Antonio River Authority

Bexar County has put aside $125 million to completely re-do a two-mile stretch of downtown’s San Pedro Creek. I've been looking at the plan in detail, and it is  pretty amazing. Currently the creek is a concrete drainage ditch, but what designers and engineers have imagined is something that looks a bit like a narrower Museum Reach.

The original reasoning for the project is flood control and water quality improvements; both to be accomplished through an underground overflow tunnel, with the added cleansing benefit that re-circulated water is pumped from it.

Bexar County

  

It’s that time of year again, when taxing entities come up with new budgets and go to taxpayers with rate increases – or in some cases, decreases.

The San Antonio River Authority is one of those taxing entities and has set a new, lower tax rate for the next fiscal year, but it means a slight increase for most homeowners because of rising property values.

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