San Antonio Symphony

If you’re looking for something to do this weekend I've been on the prowl, and have some ideas. First off, why be restrained to just staying in San Antonio when you can go interstellar? San Antonio Symphony’s President David Gross explains.

“The Symphony is presenting music from John Williams. Star Wars, Superman, ET, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Schindler’s List—all these great sound tracks.”

I asked "The dress code is going to be a bit lax this weekend?" Gross chuckled.

courtesy San Antonio Symphony

The San Antonio Symphony's weekend slate is full, but as to the music they will be playing, it may be different than you’d expect. It's going to be a lot less Bach and a lot more salsa.

“The Fiesta Pops is a series of three performances this weekend.”

Associate Conductor Akiko Fujimoto explains it.

Eric Green

In time for Valentine’s weekend, a pair of local arts institutions are performing perhaps the greatest love story of all time. We stopped by Ballet San Antonio’s practice space to speak with San Antonio Symphony’s Associate Conductor Akiko Fujimoto.

“The symphony will be performing with Ballet San Antonio Prokofiev’s great ballet Romeo and Juliet.   Prokofiev has a great way of depicting both romance and tragedy, which are the two key ingredients of the story of Romeo and Juliet.”

She says the composer has interesting ways of taking hold of your emotions.

Chance James

The San Antonio Symphony’s Strauss Festival has been their focus for the past month, but on Saturday night it comes to an end.

“This weekend is our final part to our Strauss Festival.”

The Strauss Festival that Concertmaster Eric Gratz is talking about the symphony’s yearly focus on a single composer.

“It’s sort of your one last chance to get the whole spectrum of Strauss’s music.”

I asked “Is it a particularly challenging part for you—you’ve got solos throughout, right?”

Magaret Malandruccolo/Deutsche Grammophon

The San Antonio Strauss Festival continues this week with something quite special — violinist Daniel Hope. His back story is nothing if not fascinating.

“My whole family has, in a sense, been touched by exile. My father, who was a writer, is very anti-apartheid, and we were forced to leave the country when I was a baby.”

That country was South Africa, and the family took root in London, where Hope began playing the violin as a young boy. But his interests didn’t stop with music.

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