San Pedro Creek

Progress continues to be made on the San Pedro Creek project and now it's reached a noteworthy milestone. That milestone is in hiring Carrie Brown as the project's public art curator.

Paul Flahive, Texas Public Radio

San Antonio's San Pedro Springs Park, the second oldest city park in the United States, is getting some needed updates.

The city is spending $1.8 million to create a perimeter trail with LED lighting, additional signage and monument walls.  The improvements were identified by residents in the 2013 Master Plan update.

City Archeologist Kay Hines says the changes will make the park more inviting.

San Antonio River Foundation

There’s lots of buzz about plans for a new park overlooking the Mission Reach.  The $10 million plan for Confluence Park, to be situated at the confluence of the San Antonio River and San Pedro Creek, will focus on teaching responsible water use and landscaping practices.

Stuart Allen is the project manager.

“Well, it’s a 3-1/2 acre outdoor learning classroom. The intent of the project is to create a destination on the Riverwalk where students and river visitors alike can learn about native plant species and witness a large-scale water catchment system,” Allen said.

We’ve been looking at the San Pedro Creek Project from north to south, and now we’re down to its last section, called Campo Abajo, or the Lower Field. This stretch goes from Guadalupe Street to South Alamo.

"There’s already economic development happening," said San Antonio River Authority’s Suzanne Scott about the area. "The new Kipp Academy is going to be located in this stretch and we’ve already been in conversations with them about having educational opportunities for the kids."

San Antonio River Authority

Bexar County has put aside $125 million to completely re-do a two-mile stretch of downtown’s San Pedro Creek. I've been looking at the plan in detail, and it is  pretty amazing. Currently the creek is a concrete drainage ditch, but what designers and engineers have imagined is something that looks a bit like a narrower Museum Reach.

The original reasoning for the project is flood control and water quality improvements; both to be accomplished through an underground overflow tunnel, with the added cleansing benefit that re-circulated water is pumped from it.

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