SAPD

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

San Antonio Police have issued a cease-and-desist order for drivers of a so-called ride sharing program called Lyft.

But that hasn't stopped them, and instead they are rolling forward full throttle. For passengers, taking a Lyft is easy. A rider must download the app to their smartphone, enter their credit card information and phone number, and request the ride. A driver, whose car is marked with a pink mustache, will typically pull up to the rider's location within 15 minutes, and off they go.

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

With the ongoing debate between the city and the police and firefighter unions over benefits and healthcare premiums showing no signs of concluding anytime soon, the San Antonio Chamber of Commerce commissioned a telephone survey on the issue. 

The survey, conducted for the chamber by a third party, used voter registration information for 501 random phone calls. Participants were asked if they would favor firefighters and police paying for a portion of their healthcare.

Flickr user Garrett Heath of SA Flavor / cc

San Antonio Police Chief William McManus announced Wednesday that drivers for the company Lyft were breaking a city ordinance and would be arrested if caught.

The taxi-like program works by matching drivers to people needing rides through their app. It launched in San Antonio less than a week ago.

The city outlined their concerns in a recent email to TPR:

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

San Antonio police officers and firefighters used time off of from their shifts Wednesday to fill the seats inside City Hall to hear recommendations by a task force appointed to study healthcare and retirement benefits.

That task force met a total of eight times, beginning last October. Members like chairman Reed Williams, a former city councilman, City Manager Sheryl Sculley, business leader and pension expert Sam Dawson, and firefighter Lt. Jerry Cortes looked at the city's general fund revenues versus the cost of running the public safety departments.

Studio Roosegaard / cc

In the first segment:

The future of transportation may be smart cars but it will take smart highways to get us there. From safety to pollution to the mother-of-all-issues, traffic, intelligent transportation offers promising solutions to all of them. 

In 2011 congestion alone cost Americans $121 billion in lost time and gas, according to the most recent Urban Mobility Study.

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