SAPD

Flickr user Bill Selak / cc

Parents in San Antonio are worried about the safety of their children in public schools after a spate of false threats and real guns.

Last month an email threatened mass killings at an elementary school. The result was lots of absences, as parents kept kids home, and huge losses in revenues for schools, who are paid per attendance.

Flickr user Bill Selak / cc

Even though local elementary schools took extra measures to keep students safe against a reported threat, many students still stayed home Thursday.

A letter had specified that on or about April 24, a mass violence event would take place, and targeted a school in the Northside ISD.

Thursday Police Chief William McManus toured campuses to meet with school leaders. One purpose, he said, was to be visible and to assure parents, staff and others that measures were being taken on all fronts to keep people safe.

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

San Antonio Police will continue to enforce the city's vehicle-for-hire ordinance despite a ruling by a Houston judge that allows the so-called ride-sharing companies Lyft and Uber to continue operation.

This week U.S. District Judge Vanessa Gilmore declined to issue a temporary restraining order against Lyft and Uber.

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

San Antonio Police have issued a cease-and-desist order for drivers of a so-called ride sharing program called Lyft.

But that hasn't stopped them, and instead they are rolling forward full throttle. For passengers, taking a Lyft is easy. A rider must download the app to their smartphone, enter their credit card information and phone number, and request the ride. A driver, whose car is marked with a pink mustache, will typically pull up to the rider's location within 15 minutes, and off they go.

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

With the ongoing debate between the city and the police and firefighter unions over benefits and healthcare premiums showing no signs of concluding anytime soon, the San Antonio Chamber of Commerce commissioned a telephone survey on the issue. 

The survey, conducted for the chamber by a third party, used voter registration information for 501 random phone calls. Participants were asked if they would favor firefighters and police paying for a portion of their healthcare.

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