Water customers in Northeast San Antonio began benefiting from a new water supply Friday. 

An agreement among the cities of San Antonio, Schertz and Seguin was celebrated with the dedication of the new SAWS pumping station in Schertz that augments SAWS' plan to obtain drought-proof water for its customers.

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

Last week the San Antonio Water System trustees approved a deal to begin negotiations to pipe in 50,000 acre feet of water from the Bastrop area with the Vista Ridge Consortium.

The deal would increase the city's water supply by more than 20%. The cost per acre foot is expected to be more than twice that of Edwards Aquifer supplies and slightly more than that of the forthcoming desalinization plant.


The San Antonio Water System is entering into negotiations on a water plan that would supply one-fifth of the total water the city currently uses.

The proposal from the Vista Ridge Consortium selected by SAWS will allow the pumping of more than 50,000 acre feet of water per year out of the Carrizo and Simsboro Aquifers northeast of Austin in Burleson County.

“San Antonio currently uses about 240,000 acre feet per year so the project would represent about 20% of our annual demand,” said Greg Flores, vice president of public affairs for SAWS.

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

San Antonio Water System's new desalination plant will come online in 2016. Wednesday, leaders with SAWS broke ground to officially kick-off the initiative that will purify salt water from the Wilcox Aquifer.

The salty aquifer is about two Tower of the Americas deep underground in Southern Bexar County. SAWS is building a plant that will clean all of that salt out so people can drink it. SAWS spokesperson Greg Flores said the ocean is about 20 times more salty, but it will still need to be purified.

Flickr User: Brandon Watts / cc

More than 3 million people move to Texas every year and the need for new building to accommodate housing and jobs for some of those people requires more water and more infrastructure for water. 

How we pay for some of that expansion has come under fire as the San Antonio Water System (SAWS) has recommended doubling the amount of so-called impact fees on developers from $1,297 to $2,796. Impact fees are a one-time fee that pays for water and sewer infrastructure.