Flickr user Corey Seeman (cseeman) / cc

Textbooks coming up for approval before the Texas State Board of Education next week are having their facts questioned.

Assertions that free-markets have benefited all cultures over all times as well as the importance of religion in the foundation of American law are just two of the many concerning and some argue misleading facts found in a review of this year's crop of high-school social studies textbooks. 


Texas State Board of Education Vice Chairman Thomas Ratliff said he would like to see the state completely abandon the federal No Child Left Behind program. 

Ratliff said in 2013 lawmakers reduced the number of tests for high school students but failed in their attempts to do the same for elementary and middle school students out of fear that Texas would lose its federal public education dollars. Ratliff said that money only accounts for less than 10% of the state public education budget.

Eileen Pace / TPR News

Following a series of reports released by Texas State Board of Education Vice Chairman Thomas Ratliff on charter school financial accountability, a state lawmaker said he’s looking into legislation for the 2015 session that will address the issue.

According to an analysis released by Ratliff last week:

Ryan Poppe / TPR News

Using data from the Texas Education Agency’s website, State Board of Education Vice Chairman Thomas Ratliff showed how the overall spending at a majority of charter schools is over the recommended amount set by the state.   

Ratliff said the general conversation about charter schools focuses on school choice, but, he said, the financial management and accountability isn’t something that’s often addressed. Following his study on superintendent pay at charter schools, it was suggested that he examine overall spending.

Flickr user biologycorner (Shannan Muskopf) / cc

State Board of Education Vice Chairman Thomas Ratliff wants people to know that charter school superintendents are making more money -- at times surprisingly more money -- than their public school peers. He wants to know if the schools that are run like a business, but take state funds per student, are using those state funds wisely.