School Finance

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT News

Although San Antonio leads the nation in economic inequality, many of the issues contributing to the opportunity gap between residents stem from the fundamentals: homes and education. 

courtosy: Folo Media

The San Antonio v. Rodriguez case challenged the use of local property taxes to fund school districts. 

But a 5-4 decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1973 to uphold the funding structure has led to what many have called "discriminatory" and "fundamentally unfair." 

On this "Texas Matters," we look at how this decision might have created a system of separate and unequal schools that, some argue, while not directly based on race, creates disparities along racial lines.

Illustration by Todd Wiseman / Texas Tribune

Friday, lawmakers in the Texas House are debating several legislative efforts aimed at improving the state’s school finance system, but what exactly is “school finance?” 

Courtesy SAISD

For numerous years, many school districts across Texas have seen the state’s portion of their funding steadily decrease.  House Bill 21 this legislative session was an effort to begin turning that trend around by rewriting what’s referred to as “the formulas”- the equations used for determining how much state funding is appropriated.

From Texas Standard:

After months of back and forth over how to fix what ails funding for Texas schools, lawmakers argued late into the night, Wednesday over a bill that would pump more state money into school budgets statewide. In the end, members of the House and Senate couldn't see eye to eye on what to leave in the bill to make school financing more equitable statewide.

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