School Finance

Ryan E. Poppe

Lawmakers in Austin are examining the ins and outs of the state’s school finance system  ahead of the 2017 legislative session, where funding may be limited.  The state’s highest court found the system to be constitutional, yet inadequate, and now some lawmakers are pushing to change the state formulas that may fund your child’s education

"This is an intolerable situation," Sen. Lamar Alexander said last week in a heated speech on the Senate floor.

The Tennessee Republican is chairman of the Senate's education committee, and he is furious with the Education Department. He even gave states some remarkable advice:

"If the regulations are not consistent with the law, I don't believe [states] should follow them," he said. "If the department persists, then the state should go to court to sue the department."

The Texas Supreme Court just doesn't want to get involved in how the state pays for its public schools. That was the signal the nine justices sent Friday when they unanimously ruled the state school funding system, which historically has been one of the country's most controversial, constitutional.

Houston ISD

The Texas Supreme Court says the public school finance system is broken but it's not un-constitutional.The state's GOP leader's hailed Friday's decision as a victory for tax payers but what about the school children?  The court's decision represents a departure from past school financing decisions.  What are the implications? Does this mean that the courts are no longer interested in taking on school finance issues for Texas schools? Guests

Die4kids / CC

State GOP leaders are applauding a unanimous Texas Supreme Court ruling that described the state’s school finance system as “flawed” but constitutional.  Many of the 600-plus school districts that sued to gain greater education funding said they’re stunned and disappointed.