Science & Technology

The Salt
4:16 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Could Great Lakes Fisheries Be Revived Through Fish Farms?

Opponents of Michigan fish farms say there is no room for them in the lakes because of sport fishing and other recreational activities.
sfgamchick/Flickr

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 6:20 pm

Even though Michigan is surrounded by more than 20 percent of the world's freshwater, fish farming is largely unheard of there.

But this summer, the aquaculture industry took a step forward. And that has touched off a debate over the appropriateness of fish farming on the Great Lakes.

There's only one company now in Michigan that raises fish for restaurants and grocery stores in large volumes. It's a family business, run by Dan Vogler, on a few acres near Harrietta, Mich., population 143.

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Shots - Health News
3:24 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Researcher Urges Wider Genetic Screening For Breast Cancer

Lisa Schlager of Chevy Chase, Md., demonstrates outside of the Supreme Court as arguments were made in a case seeking to determine whether the BRCA breast cancer genes can be patented. The court ruled in 2013 that individual genes can't be patented.
Tom Williams CQ Roll Call/Getty

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 11:43 am

A prominent scientist has started a big new debate about breast cancer. Geneticist Mary-Claire King of the University of Washington, who identified the first breast cancer gene, is recommending that all women get tested for genetic mutations that can cause breast cancer.

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From Our Listeners
3:16 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Hail To The Floppy Disk: Your Tired Tech That Keeps Ticking

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 5:39 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

We asked recently how do you know when it's time to replace your computer rather than repair it. I put that question to Glenn Durene, electronics editor at Consumer Reports.

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Parallels
12:54 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

From A Chinese Apartment To Wall Street Darling: The Rise Of Alibaba

Jack Ma speaks in Hangzhou, China, on May 10, 2013. Ma shot to fame as the founder of Alibaba, the pioneering Chinese e-commerce site that's poised to be one of the biggest tech IPOs ever when it goes public in New York.
Peter Parks AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 7:23 pm

Like most great origin stories, the tale behind China's e-commerce giant, Alibaba, begins simply. In the winter of 1999, Jack Ma, a former English teacher, gathered friends in an apartment in the eastern city of Hangzhou.

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All Tech Considered
12:09 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Try This On For Size: Personal Styling That Comes In The Mail

A standard "trunk" from men's online styling service Trunk Club.
Colin Marshall NPR

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 10:43 am

These days, you don't have to be a model — or a real housewife of reality TV — to have a personal stylist. You can get one online, for a reasonable monthly fee. The services, in which clothes are picked out for you and sent in the mail, are catching on among the time-starved and the fashion-challenged. Like my editor, Uri Berliner.

"Most days I couldn't even tell you what clothes I have on, what color they are," he says.

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The Two-Way
9:21 am
Mon September 8, 2014

Meteor Leaves 40-Foot Crater Near Managua's Airport

A photo released by the Nicaraguan army shows an impact crater made by a small meteorite in a wooded area near Managua's international airport and an air force base.
AP

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 10:52 am

Updated at 11:45 p.m. ET

There was an unexpected crash landing near the international airport in the Nicaraguan capital over the weekend, but luckily no one was hurt: A small meteor, thought to have broken off from an Earth-passing asteroid, left a 40-foot-wide crater.

The meteorite — which experts say may have disintegrated on impact — smashed through a wooded area outside the airport in Managua, leaving a 16-foot-deep hole.

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The Two-Way
9:12 am
Sun September 7, 2014

U.S. Pacific Blue Whales Seen Rebounding Close To Historic Levels

Off the coast of Southern California, a crowd watches a blue whale rise to the surface earlier this summer. A new study says the population of blue whales off the West Coast is close to historic levels.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Sun September 7, 2014 10:16 pm

Decades after the threat of extinction led to them being protected from whalers, there are now about 2,200 blue whales off the West Coast, according to a new study. That's roughly 97 percent of historical levels, say researchers at the University of Washington who call their findings a conservation success story.

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Animals
7:00 am
Sun September 7, 2014

At 60 Tons, This Dinosaur Feared Nothing

Originally published on Sun September 7, 2014 9:20 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Environment
7:00 am
Sun September 7, 2014

For Lack Of Mississippi Silt, The Gulf Is Losing Coastal Land

Originally published on Sun September 7, 2014 9:20 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Digital Life
7:00 am
Sun September 7, 2014

Will Apple Sell A Smart Wallet For Your Smartphone?

Originally published on Sun September 7, 2014 9:20 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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