Science & Technology

All Tech Considered
2:20 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Author: When It Comes To High-Speed Internet, U.S. 'Falling Way Behind'

Susan Crawford says that in cities like Seoul and Stockholm, high-speed, high-capacity networks are taken for granted. "It really is astonishing what's going on in America," she says. "We're falling way behind in the pack of developed nations when it comes to high-speed Internet access, capacity and prices."
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 11:41 am

For an increasing number of Americans, access to high-speed Internet has become an essential part of our lives. We do work, email friends, find restaurants, watch videos and movies, and check the weather. And the Internet is increasingly used for important services, like video medical consults and online education, and is relied upon by businesses for critical operations.

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The Two-Way
1:10 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

NASA Probe Finds Newly Formed Crater On Mars

An enhanced image of a newly formed crater on Mars. The feature, including the ejected material, stretches more than 9 miles across.
NASA

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 6:42 pm

Take a close look at the stunning image above showing a newly formed impact crater on Mars: The blue streaks of material, known as ejecta, radiate 9 miles from the 100-foot crater, according to NASA.

The picture was taken from orbit by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Nov. 19. The same area was imaged by the MRO's Context Camera in July 2010 and again in May 2012 — with no crater in the first and a telltale surface scar in the second.

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The Two-Way
11:25 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Sony Will Shed 5,000 Jobs And Its PC Business

Sony Corp. President and CEO Kazuo Hirai during a press conference at Sony headquarters in Tokyo on Thursday.
Shizuo Kambayashi AP

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 12:47 pm

The struggling electronics and entertainment company Sony announced it had suffered an annual loss of $1 billion and that it was selling its PC business and shedding 5,000 more jobs globally.

The Associated Press adds:

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Beauty Shop
10:49 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Mean Girls Online: Can We Draw A Line In Social Media?

Feminists criticizing feminists online: How does it impact the movement?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 7:57 am

Last week, an article about online feminist activism set off a heated debate. The Nation's Michelle Goldberg examined criticism aimed at feminists by other feminists. "Is it good for the movement? And whose movement is it?" Goldberg asked.

She wrote:

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Technology
10:49 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Hackathon Organizers Ask, Could A Smart Phone App Have Saved Trayvon?

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 11:29 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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All Tech Considered
6:07 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Sensory Fiction: Books That Let You Feel What The Characters Do

Changes in a book protagonist's emotional or physical state trigger discrete feedback in this wearable device.
MIT Media Lab

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 11:45 am

In our "Weekly Innovation" blog series, we explore an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Do you have an innovation to share? Use this quick form.

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The Salt
2:26 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Woolly Mammoths' Taste For Flowers May Have Been Their Undoing

Woolly mammoths depended on tiny flowering plants for protein. Did the decline of the flowers cause their extinction?
Per Möller/Johanna Anjar

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 4:01 pm

They were some of the largest, hairiest animals ever to walk the Earth, but new research shows a big part of the woolly mammoth's diet was made up of tiny flowers.

The work is based on DNA analysis of frozen arctic soil and mammoth poop. It suggests that these early vegans depended on the flowers as a vital source of protein. And when the flowers disappeared after the last ice age, so too did the mammoths that ate them.

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Science
4:29 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Chemical Study Becomes A Tale of Conspiracy And Paranoia

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 9:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Now, the strange story of Tyrone Hayes. The biologist has devoted much of his career to studying a common herbicide used on corn, called atrazine; specifically, its effects on amphibians. Hayes believes the chemical impedes the sexual development of frogs, and he's publicly argued against the use of atrazine and criticized the corporation that makes it, Syngenta.

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The Two-Way
4:26 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Antitrust Settlement With EU Calls For Google To Tweak Results

European Commission

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 4:34 pm

Part of an antitrust agreement with the European Union regulators, Google has agreed to tweak its search results in Europe.

The search giant has agreed that when a user searches for a product, for example, the search results of its rivals — Amazon, let's say — will be displayed along with those of advertisers paying Google for prominent space.

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Science
4:25 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Seeing Less Helps The Brain Hear More

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 9:23 pm

A few days in the dark can improve an animal's hearing, scientists report this week in the journal Neuron. This temporary loss of visual input seems to trigger favorable changes in areas of the brain that process auditory information, they say.

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