Science & Technology

The Salt
1:21 pm
Fri January 24, 2014

Can Mom's Pregnancy Diet Rewire Baby's Brain For Obesity?

Choose wisely: What Mom eats during pregnancy can set the stage for obesity in her baby.
Meg Vogel NPR

Originally published on Sat January 25, 2014 6:07 pm

Moms-to-be are often reminded that they're eating for two. It's tempting to take this as an excuse to go for that extra scoop of the ice cream. (Believe me, I've been there.)

But a solid body of research suggests that expectant mothers should be walking away with the opposite message: Pregnancy should be a time to double-down on healthful eating if you want to avoid setting up your unborn child for a lifetime of wrestling with obesity.

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All Tech Considered
9:50 am
Fri January 24, 2014

As Windows XP Fades Away, Will Its Users Stick With Microsoft?

A man walks past a Microsoft billboard featuring Windows XP in November 2001 in Beijing.
Kevin Lee Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 9:10 am

Windows XP may have been largely developed in a different millennium, but it's not going into retirement without a fight.

Even as Microsoft promotes Windows 8, its latest operating system, Windows XP is still the second-most used OS on nonmobile computers, according to Net Applications web analytics. Debuting in 2001, XP lasted through three new Microsoft operating systems and the growth of mobile technology.

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Around the Nation
4:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Drinking Water Not Tested For Tens Of Thousands Of Chemicals

Al Jones of the West Virginia Department of General Services tests water as he flushes faucets and opens a rest room at the State Capitol in Charleston, W. Va., on Jan. 13, four days after a chemical spill into the Elk River. It wasn't until Jan. 21 that state officials were told by Freedom Industries that a second contaminant had also entered the river.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 7:48 pm

The fact that a second contaminant in West Virginia's drinking water eluded detection for nearly two weeks — despite intense testing of the water — reveals an important truth about how companies test drinking water: In most cases, they only find the contaminants they're looking for.

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All Tech Considered
3:06 am
Fri January 24, 2014

At 30, The Original Mac Is Still An Archetype Of Innovation

A 1984 Apple Macintosh Classic was on display at the Museum for Art and Industry in Hamburg, Germany, in 2011.
Philipp Guelland dapd

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 6:58 am

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The Edge
5:03 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

How To Follow The Sochi Olympics On Twitter

You don't need a fancy outfit and a torch to connect to the 2014 Winter Olympics. Just use Twitter.
AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 10:05 am

Though Sochi is nine hours ahead of New York, social media will make it easier to keep track of many Winter Olympians in real time. We've compiled Twitter lists for each of the U.S. team rosters. We're also making lists for media, teams and international athletes — and will be adding to them as the Olympics go on.

Feel free to subscribe to any of these lists and follow @nprolympics on Twitter for the latest updates from NPR's team in Sochi.

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Technology
3:43 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

China Sends 500 Million Users On An Internet Detour

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 4:32 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Most of China's Internet users experienced an outage this week. For up to eight hours, some 500 million people could not get Web pages to load. And the leading theory about what happened is that the Chinese government mistakenly rerouted Internet traffic. Headlines about this on some news sites have been a little misleading: How the Chinese Internet Ended Up in Cheyenne, Wyoming, blared one site. And there were lots of variations on that.

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All Tech Considered
3:28 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Retailers Can Wait To Tell You Your Card Data Have Been Compromised

The security breaches at Target and Neiman Marcus have raised questions over how quickly companies are required to disclose that customer information was hacked.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 4:32 pm

You might think that retailers have to let you know right away if they get hacked and someone steals your account information.

But recent disclosures by Target and Neiman Marcus that their networks were hacked, and data about their consumers were stolen, have raised questions about how quickly merchants need to alert their customers.

In the case of Neiman Marcus, the company may have had evidence of a breach as far back as July. But the law is a bit murky on just how quickly companies need to let customers know.

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Shots - Health News
3:22 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Contagious Cancer In Dogs Leaves Prehistoric Paw Prints

The sexually transmitted cancer is common in street dogs around the world.
Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 11:36 am

Our four-legged friends suffer from many of the same cancers that we do. But one type of dog tumor acts like no other: It's contagious.

The tumor spreads from one pooch to another when the dogs have sex or even just touch or lick each other.

"It's a common disease in street dogs all around the world," says geneticist Elizabeth Murchison at the University of Cambridge. "People in the U.S. and U.K. haven't heard of it because it's found mostly in free-roaming dogs in developing countries."

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Technology
12:39 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Are E-Books Killing Reading For Fun?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Race
12:39 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

People Assumed I Was A Tech Whiz Because I'm Asian

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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