Science & Technology

The Two-Way
3:22 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Facebook's Sandberg Apologizes For Newsfeed Experiment

Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg addresses an interactive session organized by the women's wing of the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) in New Delhi on Wednesday.
Chandan Khanna AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 6:10 pm

Facebook's No. 2 executive apologized on Wednesday over an experiment that manipulated the news feeds of more than 600,000 users.

The Wall Street Journal reports Sheryl Sandberg said the study was communicated "poorly." The paper adds:

Read more
Sports
3:06 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

From Missiles To The Pitch: The Story Behind World Cup Tech

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 6:20 pm

U.S. national soccer team player Michael Bradley ran 10.4 miles during the team's World Cup game against Belgium. Brian Kopp of STATS LLC explains to Melissa Block how technology first developed by the Israeli military is now being used in athletics.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

Read more
All Tech Considered
3:06 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Apps That Share, Or Scalp, Public Parking Spots

New mobile apps connect people occupying public parking spots with people who want them, for a price.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 6:20 pm

San Francisco has seen protests against the Google bus — private buses that carry tech workers to and from the city. Now there's another transit fight, this time over parking.

A few tech entrepreneurs are helping to sell public parking spots, even auctioning them off to the highest bidder. The city's attorney says that's illegal. The app makers are not backing down.

Mobile Solutions To The Parking Problem

Read more
All Tech Considered
1:48 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

This Week's Innovation: Slippers That Fit Like A Second Skin

The slipper is made from thermosetting PVC material. Designer Satsuki Ohata claims that once it hardens to your foot's individual shape, the slippers can be worn inside and outside.
Satsuku Ohata

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 2:12 pm

If you've ever struggled with finding shoes that fit your feet perfectly, take heart. A Japanese designer has taken that universal need to a whole new level — and it all started with cheese.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:42 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

U.S. Privacy Board Says NSA Internet Spying Is Constitutional

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 4:34 pm

A bipartisan privacy board that was appointed by President Obama following the disclosures made by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden has released a report (PDF) that says the security agency's Internet spying is legal and constitutional.

Read more
Shots - Health News
12:43 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Costlier Digital Mammograms May Not Be Better For Older Women

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 1:07 pm

Medicare spending on breast cancer screening for women age 65 and older has jumped nearly 50 percent in recent years. But the rise in price was not associated with an improvement in the early detection of breast cancer.

Researchers at the Yale School of Medicine found that Medicare spending on breast cancer screening rose from $666 million in the years 2001-2002 to $962 million in the years 2008-2009.

So why the big increases in costs?

Read more
Shots - Health News
12:03 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

With Help From Extinct Humans, Tibetans Adapted To High Altitude

A mother and daughter herd their yaks along a highway on the Tibetan plateau.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 4:15 pm

At an altitude of nearly 3 miles, the Tibetan plateau is an extreme place to live. It's cold, it's hard to grow food, and there's about 40 percent less oxygen in the air than there is at sea level.

Somehow, though, native Tibetans are adapted to it. Their bodies — and their blood in particular — work differently than those of people used to lower altitudes. The Tibetans' advantage might be thanks to an ancient inheritance.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:41 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Google Glass Faces A Ban In British Movie Theaters

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 1:03 pm

Just one week after Google Glass went on sale in the U.K., fears of piracy have led to calls to ban the eyewear from being worn in movie theaters.

Criticism of the Google device, which can allow those wearing it to record what they see, has come from the powerful Cinema Exhibitors' Association, which as the BBC reports "has no power to enforce a ban, but instead makes recommendations to most of the country's cinema industry."

From London, Ari Shapiro reports:

Read more
Shots - Health News
10:37 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Easy Method For Making Stem Cells Was Too Good To Be True

The heart beats in a mouse embryo grown with stem cells made from blood. Now the research that claimed a simple acid solution could be used to create those cells has been retracted.
Courtesy of Haruko Obokata

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 10:21 am

A prestigious scientific journal Wednesday took the unusual step of retracting some high-profile research that had generated international excitement about stem cell research.

The British scientific journal Nature retracted two papers published in January by scientists at the Riken research institute in Japan and at Harvard Medical School that claimed that they could create stem cells simply by dipping skin and blood cells into acid.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:19 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Oh, Pooh: Bear Cub Gets Head Stuck In Cookie Jar

A bear cub that had to be rescued from a tree after getting its head stuck in a cookie jar is shown in a handout photo from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 11:25 am

Blame it on the animal crackers. A plastic jar of the treats was too enticing for a young bear in New Jersey, which got its head irretrievably wedged in the container. When people approached it to help, the 28-pound bear cub got scared — and climbed 40 feet up a tree, where it became stuck.

The incident happened in Ringwood, a small New Jersey town that's situated among forests and parkland. Workers from the state Environmental Protection Department and other local agencies got the cub safely back down and cut the jar off its head — but not before taking a photo of its plight.

Read more

Pages