Science & Technology

Technology
7:24 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Helping Haiti, In 3-D

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 1:25 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Three years after a devastating earthquake, Haiti is still struggling to recover. The disaster killed health workers, flattened clinics, and the already poor country quickly ran short of medical supplies. Despite massive amounts of aid, needs remain. Critical medical instruments, for example, are difficult to import. But what if they could be produced with the push of a button?

Well, one American aid group has come up with an unlikely solution: using 3D printing technology.

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Animals
4:21 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Saving The Native Prairie — One Black-Footed Ferret At A Time

Biologist Travis Livieri checks a briefly sedated ferret's health status inside an improvised trailer clinic.
Elizabeth Shogren NPR

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 1:25 pm

American pioneers saw the endless stretches of grassland of the Great Plains as a place to produce grain and beef for a growing country. But one casualty was the native prairie ecosystem and animals that thrived only there.

Some biologists are trying to save the prairies and they've picked a hero to help them: the black-footed ferret. In trying to save this long skinny predator with a raccoon-like mask, the biologists believe they have a chance to right a wrong that nearly wiped a species off the planet.

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Science
4:08 pm
Sat November 30, 2013

Putting A Price On 'Dueling Dinosaur' Fossils

What would you pay for a fossil of two complete dinosaurs locked in what seems to be a fight to the death? An auction house put that question to the test with the dinosaurs, discovered in 2006 in the Hell Creek formation of Montana. It got an unexpected answer.

Code Switch
7:03 am
Sat November 30, 2013

Odds Favor White Men, Asian Women On Dating App

A recent study on data from a dating app found all women except black women were most drawn to white men, and men of all races (with one notable exception) prefer Asian women.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 4:26 pm

Researchers recently took data from the Facebook app Are You Interested and found that not only is race a factor in our online dating interests, but particular races get disproportionately high — and low — amounts of interest.

Of the 2.4 million heterosexual interactions researchers reviewed, the findings show:

  • Women get three times the interactions men do.
  • All men seemed to be more interested in people outside their race.
  • Black men and women get the lowest response rates to their messages.
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Digital Life
6:31 am
Sat November 30, 2013

Tester Finds Novel Ways To Use Google Glass

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 9:31 am

A.J. Jacobs, editor at large for Esquire magazine, is one of several thousand people testing Google Glass, the mini-computers for the face. Jacobs has used them to — among other things — cheat at poker. He tells all to host Scott Simon.

Technology
6:31 am
Sat November 30, 2013

Just What Is Yahoo Anymore, Anyway?

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 9:27 am

The company has just hired Katie Couric, the latest in a long list of high-profile defections from other media outlets, including The New York Times. But what is Yahoo, exactly? Media analyst and journalism professor Jeff Jarvis joins host Scott Simon to explain.

The Salt
4:40 am
Sat November 30, 2013

These Cookbook Photos Redefine What Fresh Seafood Looks Like

How to make dead fish look attractive? That's the challenge New York-based duo Shimon and Tammar Rothstein faced when they were hired to do the photography for famed French chef Eric Ripert's book On the Line.
Photos by Shimon and Tammar, Courtesy of Shimon and Tammar

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 10:05 am

How to make dead fish look attractive? That's the challenge New York-based duo Shimon and Tammar Rothstein faced when they were hired to do the photography for famed French chef Eric Ripert's book On the Line.

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Around the Nation
4:39 am
Sat November 30, 2013

From Lab To Lectern, Scientists Learn To Turn On the Charm

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 5:15 pm

About 20 scientists are clustered in a cramped conference room in San Diego, one of the country's science hubs, but they aren't there to pore over their latest research. Instead, this is a meeting of BioToasters — a chapter of the public speaking organization Toastmasters, geared specifically toward scientists.

"For a typical scientist, they will spend a lot of time at the bench, so they're doing a lot of maybe calculations or lab work where they're not interacting directly from person to person," says BioToasters President Zackary Prag, a lab equipment sales rep.

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Environment
4:37 am
Sat November 30, 2013

Tech Leaders, Economists Split Over Clean Energy's Prospects

Andres Quiroz, an installer for Stellar Solar, carries a solar panel during installation at a home in Encinitas, Calif.
Sam Hodgson Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 12:17 pm

There is a broad scientific consensus that to keep global warming in check, we need to phase out 80 percent of all oil, coal and natural gas by midcentury. President Obama has set a nonbinding target to do precisely that.

There are technologists who say this national goal is well within reach, but there are also economists who are quite pessimistic about those prospects. And you can find this range of opinion on the University of California, Berkeley campus.

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