Science & Technology

The Two-Way
6:13 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Book News: Battle Rages On In Amazon Vs. Overstock Price War

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 7:51 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Environment
2:17 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Our Once And Future Oceans: Taking Lessons From Earth's Past

Changes to the acidity of the Earth's ancient oceans affected the coral reefs more than 50 million years ago. And researchers are using that information to try to predict how the planet might fare in our rapidly changing climate. Above, the Wheeler Reef section of the Great Barrier Reef.
Auscape UIG via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 11:48 am

One of the most powerful ways to figure out how the Earth will respond to all the carbon dioxide we're putting into the atmosphere is to look back into the planet's history.

Paleontologists have spent a lot of time trying to understand a time, more than 50 million years ago, when the planet was much hotter than it is today. They're finding that the news isn't all bad when you take the long view.

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The Two-Way
4:18 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

In New Video Game, China Seizes Disputed Islands From Japan

Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force escort ship Kurama leads other vessels during a fleet review amid heightened tension last year over the disputed Senkaku/Diaoyu islands.
Itsuo Inouye AP

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 7:11 am

Chinese gamers may soon be able to settle by force a thorny international dispute between their government and Japan over who controls a small chain of islands in the East China Sea.

The basic platform of the newly released Glorious Mission Online was developed as a training tool for the People's Liberation Army. Game maker Giant Interactive Group (GIG) has expanded the "first-person shooter" game with a simulation of a Chinese amphibious assault on the Senkaku islands, as they are known in Tokyo, or Diaoyu, as Beijing calls them.

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The Salt
4:17 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

What Poisoned Pomegranates Tell Us About Food Safety

The label for the berry blend recalled in June because of pomegranates linked to a hepatitis A outbreak.
Food and Drug Administration

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 4:48 pm

Imported food is getting the kind of attention these days that no product wants. Health officials in Iowa and Nebraska are blaming salad greens for making hundreds of people sick with a parasite called cyclospora. That parasite usually comes from the tropics, so it's likely the salad did, too. Earlier this summer, pomegranate seeds from Turkey were linked to an outbreak of hepatitis A.

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Business
3:54 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Google Ups Its Game Against Apple With New Smartphone

The new Moto X launched Thursday in New York City.
Bryan Bedder Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 10:40 am

When it was launched Thursday, the Moto X, Google's first smartphone product to come out of its buyout of Motorola, was not the highest powered or highest pixeled device. Rather, the designers boasted of its usability — that the Moto X has a larger purpose: making the technology of a phone adapt to the way people use them, rather than force user behavior to adapt to the technology.

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The Two-Way
1:17 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Unique Bike Treks Up East Coast, Powered By Solar And Pedals

In a photo taken on July 24, ELF bike owner Mark Stewart discusses the unusual vehicle during his trip from North Carolina to Massachusetts.
Valerie Bonk AP

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 2:30 pm

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Shots - Health News
1:11 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

What Outbreak? Students Tune Out Tweeted Health Warnings

Buzz, Georgia Tech's mascot, wasn't the only bug in the students' midst last fall. An outbreak of bacterial pneumonia sickened at least 83 in what the CDC called the largest known outbreak at a university in 35 years.
Collegiate Images/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 4:26 pm

You can lead college students to soap and water, but you can't make them wash their hands. In fact, you can't even make them read their e-mail.

That was one takeaway from an outbreak of pneumonia at Georgia Tech last fall that sickened at least 83 students – "the largest [outbreak] reported at a university in 35 years," according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Shots - Health News
11:16 am
Thu August 1, 2013

Want To Be A Morning Person? Take A Few Tips From Campers

All in the name of science: Volunteers hike in Colorado during their one-week hiatus from electrical lighting.
Courtesy of Kenneth Wright

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 1:07 pm

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All Songs Considered
10:26 am
Thu August 1, 2013

The Good Listener: Are Bands Right To Scold Fans With Cellphones?

The Gaslight Anthem, as seen through a cellphone.
Adam Gasson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 5:59 pm

We get a lot of mail at NPR Music, and amid the helpful $40-a-pop reminders not to speed on North Capitol Street is a slew of smart questions about how music fits into our lives. This week: a discussion of cellphone recordings at concerts.

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Technology
4:18 am
Thu August 1, 2013

NSA Chief Faces Tough Crowd At Hacker Conference

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 9:23 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

And I'm Renee Montagne.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In this case, what happens in Vegas does not stay in Vegas. A standing room only crowd packed a ballroom at Caesar's Palace yesterday to hear General Keith Alexander. The director of the National Security Agency delivered a keynote address to a hacker conference. And given the recent NSA leak, he ended up in front of a very tough crowd.

NPR's Steve Henn was there.

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