Science & Technology

All Tech Considered
5:07 am
Fri September 27, 2013

BlackBerry: If You Don't Survive, May You Rest In Peace

Steve Henn NPR

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 3:45 pm

This may be premature, but it is best to think of this post as an obituary for the BlackBerry, a phone struck down seemingly in its prime. Gone so soon.

BB, we'll miss you.

Over the course of its existence, BlackBerry sold smartphones to more than 200 million people. It became ubiquitous in places like Indonesia, but it began with an invasion of Wall Street and Washington.

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Research News
2:06 am
Fri September 27, 2013

How Recycling Bias Affects What You Toss Where

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 5:07 am

During an experiment, marketing professor Remi Trudel noticed a pattern in what his volunteers were recycling versus throwing in the garbage. He then went through his colleagues' trash and recycling bins at Boston University for more data.

He found the same pattern, says NPR's Shankar Vedantam: "Whole sheets of paper typically went in the recycling, but paper fragments went in the trash."

Same type of paper, different shapes, different bins.

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All Tech Considered
2:02 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Students Find Ways To Hack School-Issued iPads Within A Week

Customers test out iPad minis on display in Los Angeles. Students who received free iPads from the Los Angeles Unified School District in a deal with Apple are finding ways to use them for more than just classwork.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 9:53 am

Los Angeles Unified School District started issuing iPads to its students this school year, as part of a $30 million deal with Apple. The rollout is in the first of three phases, and ultimately, the goal is to distribute more than 600,000 devices.

But less than a week after getting their iPads, almost 200 of the districts' high school students found a way to bypass software blocks on the devices that limit what websites the students can use.

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The Two-Way
5:18 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Scientists Find Sea Louse Has Tidal 'Body Clock'

The speckled sea louse.
Wikipedia Commons

One thing you can say about the diminutive speckled sea louse: it's always on time.

Scientists studying the tiny crustacean, a marine cousin of the wood-louse, found that it runs not one, but two internal clocks. Not only does the creature have a circadian rhythm, or so called "body clock" like most land-dwelling animals, including humans, but it also has a circatidal clock that follows the 12.4-hour cycle of the tide.

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Digital Life
4:44 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

'Popular Science': Web Comments Are Bad For Science

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 6:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The Internet, from its inception, has been embraced as a great democracy, a leveler, a town square. Upload a video, like a friend's status, write a comment about an article you read, insert your thoughts here. Well, you can no longer do that on the Popular Science magazine website, Popsci.com. It announced on Tuesday that comments can be bad for science.

And joining us to explain more about the decision is Jacob Ward, editor and chief of Popular Science magazine. Welcome to the program.

JACOB WARD: Great to be with you.

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Technology
4:44 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

NSA Revelations Leave Encryption Experts In A Quandry

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 6:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The technology world is reeling. That's after press reports earlier this month that the National Security Agency may have weakened computer software. The reason, to make it easier for the government to read encrypted messages. The stories have upset many encryption experts, the very people who help scramble digital communications to keep those messages secure.

NPR's Larry Abramson reports.

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Environment
4:44 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Drought Forces New Mexico Ranchers to Better Manage the Land

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 6:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

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The Two-Way
12:10 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

eBay To Acquire Payment Processor Braintree For $800 Million

An illustration of online payment service PayPal at LeWeb Paris 2012 in Saint-Denis, France.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 12:51 pm

Auction site eBay, which owns PayPal, is buying the online and mobile payment company Braintree for $800 million — an acquisition that eBay's CEO calls "a perfect fit."

The deal, announced Thursday, could help eBay as it tries to convince customers to ditch their credit and debit cards and use PayPal instead.

"Braintree is a perfect fit with PayPal," eBay Inc. President and CEO John Donahoe said in a statement.

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All Tech Considered
12:06 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

What You Emailed Us About Using The 'ACC'

We're still combing through all your emails about the acc.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 1:16 pm

This morning, I griped about the acc, our newly coined name for the practice of copying a third party on an existing email chain to undermine or pull rank on the original recipient. (The A can stand for angry, awkward, annoying ... or other A-words you might be thinking of ...)

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Shots - Health News
11:39 am
Thu September 26, 2013

For A Price, Volunteers Endure Scientists' Flu Spritzes

How much would a scientist have to pay you to get sick with the flu?
F.T. Werner iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 2:01 pm

What would it take to persuade you to allow government researchers to squirt millions of live flu viruses up your nose?

A recently concluded project at the National Institutes of Health found, among other things, that $3,400 each was enough to attract plenty of volunteers.

"I am happy I could contribute in some way," says Kelli Beyer, 24, one of 46 healthy people who volunteered for the project. To get the money, the research subjects had to commit to several days of testing, then nine days in a hospital isolation ward once the virus was administered in a nasal spray.

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