Science & Technology

TED Radio Hour
8:39 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Predicting The Future

Will the predictions of today turn into the reality of tomorrow?
Thinkstock

"I do spend time trying to think about what I cannot imagine." -- Nicholas Negroponte

Visions of the future don't just have to come from science fiction. There's very real technology today giving us clues about how our future lives might be transformed. So what might our future look like? And what does it take for an idea about the future to become a reality? In this hour, TED speakers make some bold predictions and explain how we might live in the future.

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All Tech Considered
6:33 am
Fri September 13, 2013

A Few Takes On How To Fix The Tech Industry's 'Bro' Problem

Hackers pose at Disrupt Hackathon in 2011.
Araya Diaz Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 9:03 am

The tech industry's sometimes sexist "brogrammer" culture came into focus at least twice this week, making it as good a time as any to highlight the running conversation about how to constructively change the systemic, entrenched issues that allow for offensive apps like Titstare, which was presented at a tech industry hackathon.

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Remembrances
3:58 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Sound Pioneer Ray Dolby Dies At 80

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 7:26 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Ray Dolby, whose inventions revolutionized the way audiences listen to entertainment, has died. He was 80 years old.

NPR's Mandalit del Barco reports the sound pioneer - whose name became synonymous with sound - died at home in San Francisco.

MANDALIT DEL BARCO, BYLINE: Thank Ray Dolby for inventing the system that surrounds you with sound at the movie theater and in your headphones.

(SOUNDBITE OF VARIOUS DOLBY SOUNDS)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: (Whispering) Surround you.

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Science
2:07 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Living Gears Help This Bug Jump

An image from an electron microscope of the back legs of a planthopper insect.
Gregory Sutton

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 12:21 pm

Greg Sutton was closely inspecting the back legs of a planthopper nymph — a small green, flightless insect — when he noticed something odd.

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Environment
2:06 am
Fri September 13, 2013

'Rivers On Rolaids': How Acid Rain Is Changing Waterways

Gwynns Falls runs beneath Interstate 95 at Carroll Park in Baltimore. The chemistry of this river, like many across the country, is changing.
Courtesy of Sujay Kaushal

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 9:47 am

Something peculiar is happening to rivers and streams in large parts of the United States — the water's chemistry is changing. Scientists have found dozens of waterways that are becoming more alkaline. Alkaline is the opposite of acidic — think baking soda or Rolaids.

Research published in the current issue of Environmental Science and Technology shows this trend to be surprisingly widespread, with possibly harmful consequences.

What's especially odd about the finding is its cause: It seems that acid rain actually has been causing waterways to grow more alkaline.

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Shots - Health News
2:03 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Treating Kids' Cancer With Science And A Pocket Full Of Hope

Dr. Jim Olson meets with Carver Faull at Seattle Children's Hospital in August. Carver, now 12, had surgery to remove a brain tumor in 2012.
Matthew Ryan Williams for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 9:02 am

Try to imagine someone who is supremely calm while at the same time bursting with energy, and you've got a pretty good idea of what Jim Olson is like.

He's a cancer researcher, physician, cyclist, kayaker and cook, not always in that order. He approaches each activity with incredible passion.

But to really understand Olson, you have to watch him in action with patients.

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The Two-Way
5:22 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

WATCH: Waterspout On Lake Michigan

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 6:04 pm

At least two waterspouts were seen over Lake Michigan on Thursday, near the Wisconsin border, amid strong winds and a marine warning issued by the National Weather Service.

The Associated Press says the waterspouts — tornadoes that form over the water — merged into one and then split again. The video below, taken by an amateur in Pleasant Prairie, Wis., appears to be a single, merged, waterspout:

Space
4:44 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

See Ya, Voyager: Probe Has Finally Entered Interstellar Space

This artist's illustration shows the Voyager 1 space probe. The spacecraft was launched on Sept. 5, 1977, and as of August 2012, it is outside the bubble of hot gas, known as the "heliopause," that radiates from the sun.
NASA/Landov

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 8:34 pm

NASA's two Voyager spacecraft, launched in 1977, have made history in a dramatic fashion by exploring the outer planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Now one of the vehicles, Voyager I, has made another pioneering leap. It is the first spacecraft to leave the vast bubble of hot gas that surrounds our solar system.

At long last, Voyager 1 is now in interstellar space.

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The Two-Way
4:32 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Twitter Says It Intends To Go Public

In this Nov. 8, 2011, photo, NASA fan David Parmet signs his name on a Twitter logo during a tweetup event for about 50 of NASA's Twitter followers at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va.
Brock Vergakis AP

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 4:45 pm

After much speculation, Twitter announced its intention to be traded as a public company, on Thursday.

Naturally, the 200-million-user microblogging service made the announcement through a tweet:

While pondering an announcement, USA Today reported that this initial public offering would be watched very carefully by other tech companies looking to take the plunge. The paper added:

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The Two-Way
1:53 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Voyager Has Left The Solar System (This Time For Real!)

A NASA image of one of the Voyager space probes, launched in 1977 to study the outer solar system and eventually interstellar space.
NASA Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 4:31 pm

Stop us if you've heard this one: A spacecraft flies out of the solar system ...

Yes, the planetary probe Voyager 1, launched in the era of Jimmy Carter and bell-bottoms, has finally left the room, so to speak, years after completing its primary mission: a "grand tour" of the gas giants Jupiter and Saturn (twin Voyager 2 also visited Uranus and Neptune).

And years after we first started talking about its departure.

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