Science & Technology

All Tech Considered
11:44 am
Wed June 11, 2014

No More Stubborn Lids: A Pickle Jar You Can Open With Ease

A new jar (at left) is shaped liked a parallelogram so that its lid can be opened with less force.
Nikkei Technology

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 1:10 pm

Our "Weekly Innovation" blog series explores an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Do you have an innovation to share? Use this quick form.

Read more
NPR Ed
8:26 am
Wed June 11, 2014

iPads Allow Kids With Challenges To Play In High School Band

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 10:16 am

Tablet computers and a creative teacher have helped open doors for some kids with serious learning disabilities and autism spectrum disorders. The P.S. 177 Technology Band is in Queens, N.Y.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Technology
5:18 am
Wed June 11, 2014

Project Eavesdrop: What Passive Surveillance Collects

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 8:00 am

Over the past year, we've learned a lot about what the National Security Agency can do. Our technology correspondent allowed his phone and Internet activities to be monitored to see what was revealed.

Krulwich Wonders...
5:03 am
Wed June 11, 2014

How We Learned That Frogs Fly

Robert Krulwich NPR

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 9:51 am

There are places where frogs could be — but aren't.

And places where frogs could be — and are.

Ninety years ago, scientists were debating the question of animal dispersal. How come there are kangaroos in Australia, and none in southern Africa --which seems, environmentally, very kangaroo-friendly? Certain frogs show up in warm ponds in one part of the world, but warm ponds a thousand miles away have none. Why?

Read more
Science
3:13 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

Bye-Bye To The Home Of A Favorite Internet Conspiracy Theory

The remote HAARP facility in Alaska has 180 antennas that are used to study the ionosphere.
Courtesy of Christopher Fallen

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 8:05 pm

It sure looks suspicious: a remote military compound in the south-central Alaskan wilderness filled with 180 weird-looking antennas.

It's the home of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP). Conspiracy theorists have accused the program of doing everything from mind control to global communications jamming.

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:35 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

Doctors Don't Know What Women Want To Know About Birth Control

Numbers represent the percent of patients and doctors who ranked each issue in their top three concerns to discuss during consultations.
Maanvi Singh/NPR

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 9:33 am

Women have choices in contraception, from pills and injections to intrauterine devices and the NuvaRing. But when women discuss birth control with their doctors, they may not be getting all the information they want, a survey finds.

Read more
Technology
11:53 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Arab Entrepreneurs Head To Silicon Valley To Grow Their Ventures

Nafeesa Syeed's book tells stories of women making a way for themselves and others in the Arab world.
Courtesy of Nafeesa Syeed

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 5:35 pm

Top tech entrepreneurs from across the Middle East and North Africa are in Silicon Valley this week visiting companies like Twitter, Facebook and Google. The week culminates in the TechWadi forum, where the most impressive Arab entrepreneurs from around the world will be recognized.

Throughout the week, Arab innovators will be brainstorming with successful CEOs, learning how to expand their companies and getting tips on pitching to investors.

Read more
The Salt
11:04 am
Tue June 10, 2014

The Salad Frontier: Why Astronauts Need To Grow Lettuce In Space

Astronaut Steve "Swanny" Swanson tends to lettuce plants growing at the International Space Station that may one day make it into his salad.
Courtesy of NASA

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 2:14 pm

Have you ever craved a salad, I mean really craved a salad because you've been eating a lot of freeze-dried meat and beans?

Astronauts who spend months on end in space sure do miss their greens. That's why NASA is embarking on a program to get astronauts growing their own food. First stop is the International Space Station and a vegetable production system called Veg-01, or "Veggie."

Read more
NPR Story
9:20 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Translating The Web With Millions: Luis Von Ahn Answers Your Questions

Computer programmer and entrepreneur Luis von Ahn wants you to help translate the web by learning a new language.
Courtesy of the Duolingo archives

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 10:29 am

Luis von Ahn believes humans can solve big problems with technology, and not even know they're doing it. He's behind innovative projects like reCAPTCHA, which crowdsources human brainpower to digitize books. His latest project is Duolingo, a free website that teaches foreign languages. While people are using it, they're also translating the Web from english into every major language.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:14 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Drones Approved: FAA Gives OK To First Commercial Use Over Land

A 2011 photo shows an AeroVironment Puma drone being prepared for launch by University of Alaska researchers. The FAA says it approved BP's use of the drone to survey oil fields in Alaska.
Keith Cunningham AP

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 12:24 pm

The Federal Aviation Administration says it has issued the first permit in its history for an unmanned aircraft to fly over U.S. soil. Oil company BP will use a drone from the company AeroVironment to conduct surveys in Alaska.

The first drone flights under the recently issued waiver have already taken place, the FAA says.

From the agency's news release:

Read more

Pages