Science & Technology

Science
4:03 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Eavesdropping On Nature Gives Clues To Biodiversity

Scientists could use recordings of wildlife to monitor the movements of invasive species like the European starling.
Liz Leyden iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 9:00 pm

Biology professor Mitch Aide uses his ears to learn about the frogs, birds and insects that are all around him. This scientist at the University of Puerto Rico is trying to track how animal populations are affected by a world that's under increasing pressure from human activities.

Aide says, "We would like to have five, 10, 20 years of data of how populations are changing."

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The Salt
4:03 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Can Oysters With No Sex Life Repopulate The Chesapeake Bay?

Young oysters live on old oyster shells and slowly mature while forming a complete shell.
Astrid Riecken Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 7:00 pm

The Chesapeake Bay once supplied half the world's oyster market. But pollution, disease and over-harvesting have nearly wiped out the population. It's a dire situation that's united former adversaries to revive the oyster ecosystem and industry.

Scientists and watermen have joined forces to plant underwater farms in the bay with a special oyster bred in a lab. Called triploid oysters, they have been selected for attributes like disease tolerance and fast growth.

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All Tech Considered
1:42 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

A Bedding Innovation For People Who Hate Making Their Beds

Smart Bedding demo photo.
Courtesy of Smart Bedding

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 3:51 pm

In a blog series we're calling "Weekly Innovation," we'll explore an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Last week we featured the sink-urinal. (Do you have an innovation to share? Use this quick form.)

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Shots - Health News
12:37 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

The Family That Tweets Together Stays Together

Snapchatting, Dad? Could be helping you stay close to the kids.
iStockphoto.com

Retweeted by Mom? Teenagers might say they'd die of embarrassment. But teenagers who are connected with their parents via Twitter and other social media have better relationships with them, and fewer behavioral problems.

A study that asked teens if they used social media to communicate with their parents found that half said yes. And 16 percent said they used social media with their parents every day.

Half of the teens in a this study said they used social media to communicate with the folks. Almost 20 percent said they communicated with Mom and Dad that way every day.

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The Protojournalist
11:29 am
Tue July 16, 2013

The Great American Wiknic [edit]

Andrew Breza
Hanna Meisel NPR

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 1:37 pm

_________________________________________

As if from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Open source, open data, open Web — the Wikimedia Foundation is all about information on the Web being open and free to use. That's the thinking behind Wikipedia, the crowd-created online knowledge base of more than 27 million articles written in nearly 300 languages.

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Animals
2:16 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Om Nom Nom: T. Rex Was, Indeed, A Voracious Hunter

Mind The Teeth: Fossils indicate that Tyrannosaurus rex was an active hunter, in addition to being a scavenger. And in Jurassic Park, it also had a sweet tooth for lawyers.
Universal Pictures Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 9:44 am

Tyrannosaurus rex is perhaps one of the most famous animals to have ever roamed the Earth. This huge, fierce meat-eater has graced Hollywood films as the perpetual villain, and it has played a notorious role in the science community that studies it, too.

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Shots - Health News
3:07 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Doctors Heed Prescription For Computerized Records

Heather Garris, a custodian of medical records, organizes patients' files at Colorado Springs Internal Medicine in Colorado Springs, Colo.
Barry Gutierrez for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 8:39 am

Uncle Sam wants your doctor to go digital. And the federal government is backing that up with money for practices that start using computerized systems for record keeping.

Nearly half of all physicians in America still rely on paper records for most patient care. Time is running out for those who do to take advantage of federal funds to make the switch. So practices like Colorado Springs Internal Medicine are scrambling to get with the program.

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All Tech Considered
2:52 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Did Social Media Help Ease Tensions After Zimmerman Verdict?

Trayvon Martin supporters sit in New York City's Times Square on Sunday after marching from a rally for Martin in Manhattan.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:21 am

Calm largely prevailed after a jury acquitted George Zimmerman Saturday night in the killing of Trayvon Martin. Law enforcement and community leaders had prepared for potential unrest, and riots had been feared for months. Slate's Dave Weigel sums up the fears:

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Krulwich Wonders...
12:08 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

I Bet I Can Create A 25 Million-Year-Old False Alarm, Says Biologist E.O. Wilson

Noah Poritz Science Source

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 3:33 pm

The world's most famous ant-scholar likes to daydream. "So much good science — and perhaps all of great science," he writes in his new book "has its roots in fantasy."

Here's his.

After seeing Jurassic Park, where scientists clone dinosaurs from the blood of ancient dino-biting mosquitoes,Wilson thought: Hmmm, that's a little far-fetched, but I bet I can do a version that might be "really and truly possible."

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All Tech Considered
2:04 am
Mon July 15, 2013

How Hackers Tapped Into My Cellphone For Less Than $300

It's easier — and cheaper — than you'd expect to hack a cellphone, say a team of white hat hackers.
iStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 7:57 am

In the wake of the National Security Agency cyber-spying revelations, you may be worrying about the government keeping track of your digital life. But, for less than $300, a group of ordinary hackers found a way to tap right into Verizon cellphones.

This is a group of good-guy, or "white hat", hackers. They hacked the phones to warn wireless carriers that the phones have a security flaw.

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