Science & Technology

NPR Story
10:53 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Having a Dog May Mean Having Extra Microbes

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 1:57 pm

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Flora Lichtman, filling in for Ira Flatow today. If you could count up all the bacteria in your house, how many different species do you think you'd find - 50, a couple hundred? How about thousands, with an S at the end? My next guest had volunteers swab surfaces in their home - pillowcase, the TV screen, the toilet seat - to see what might be living there. And in each of the 40 households, the same spots were swabbed.

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TED Radio Hour
8:58 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Memory Games

"We all look through family albums. We all hear stories at the dinner table. ... They become incorporated into what we believe we actually remember." — Scott Fraser
Marc Grimberg Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 4:33 pm

Memory is malleable, dynamic and elusive. In this hour, TED speakers discuss how a nimble memory can improve your life, and how a frail one might ruin someone else's.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

TED Radio Hour
8:58 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Can Anyone Learn To Be A Master Memorizer?

Joshua Foer says that one past memory champion developed a technique to remember more than 4,000 binary digits in half an hour.
James Duncan Davidson

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 4:39 pm

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Memory Games.

About Joshua Foer's TEDTalk

Some people can memorize thousands of numbers, the names of dozens of strangers or the precise order of cards in a shuffled deck. Science writer and U.S. Memory Champion Joshua Foer shows how anyone can become a memory virtuoso, including him.

About Joshua Foer

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TED Radio Hour
8:58 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Can Eyewitnesses Create Memories?

Forensic psychologist Scott Fraser says, "all of our memories, put simply, are reconstructed memories."
TEDxUSC

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 8:01 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Memory Games.

About Scott Fraser's TEDTalk

Forensic psychologist Scott Fraser studies how we remember crimes. He describes a deadly shooting and explains how eyewitnesses can create memories that they haven't seen. Why? Because the brain is always trying to fill in the blanks.

About Scott Fraser

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TED Radio Hour
8:58 am
Fri May 24, 2013

How Do Experiences Become Memories?

Daniel Kahneman says, "we tend to confuse memories with the real experience that gave rise to those memories."
James Duncan Davidson TED / James Duncan Davidson

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 3:37 pm

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Memory Games.

About Daniel Kahneman's TEDTalk

Nobel laureate and founder of behavioral economics Daniel Kahneman goes through a series of examples of things we might remember, from vacations to colonoscopies. He explains how our "experiencing selves" and our "remembering selves" perceive happiness differently.

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Krulwich Wonders...
7:45 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Who's The Best Drinker? Dogs? Cats? Or Pigeons?

Newspix/Rex/Rex USA

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 10:56 am

Take a look at this.

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Digital Life
4:34 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Viewers To Decide If Amazon's Sample Shows Make The Cut

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 7:01 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The popular series "Arrested Development" returns this Sunday with 15 new episodes, released all at once. They're coming from Netflix, which earlier this year, released "House of Cards." Online video companies are producing more of their own shows - not just Netflix, Hulu and Yahoo are getting into the act, as well.

Now, Amazon also wants to join, but they're doing things differently, letting viewers help choose the new lineup. Here's what TV critic Eric Deggans thinks of that approach.

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Planet Money
1:54 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Can This Man Bring Silicon Valley To Yangon?

Lam Thuy Vo NPR

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 8:29 am

Like a proud father, Nay Aung opens up his MacBook Air to show me the Myanmar travel website he has built. But we wait 30 seconds for the site to load, and nothing happens.

"Today is a particularly bad day for Internet," he says. This is life in Myanmar today: Even an Internet entrepreneur can't always get online.

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Science
5:49 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

'Extremely Active' Atlantic Hurricane Season Predicted

Hurricane Sandy churns off the Atlantic coast on Oct. 29. NOAA officials are forecasting seven to 11 hurricanes, compared with about six in a typical season.
NASA Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 7:23 pm

Unusually warm ocean temperatures and favorable wind patterns mean the Atlantic is likely to see "an active or extremely active" hurricane season this year, say officials from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The agency expects between seven and 11 hurricanes and as many as 20 named storms during the 2013 season, which runs from June 1 through November.

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The Salt
5:42 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Inside A Tart Cherry Revival: 'Somebody Needs To Do This!'

At Michigan State University's Clarksville Research Station, researchers apply pollen by hand to tart cherry blossoms, in order to breed new varieties.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 10:29 am

Some fruits, like apples, you can find anywhere. But others have gotten a little bit lost in today's global food business.

Take tart cherries, also known as sour cherries. Unlike sweet cherries, America's tart cherries are too fragile to ship very far, so most people never get to taste a fresh one.

They're typically frozen, then baked into that iconic American dessert, the cherry pie — and cherry pies aren't as popular as they used to be.

Yet the humble sour cherry is experiencing an unlikely renaissance — and the best may be yet to come.

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