Science & Technology

Research News
11:16 am
Fri April 25, 2014

'Blood Victory' In Medical Research Dispute

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 11:59 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This week is an anniversary for a Native-American community in Arizona. The Havasupai Tribe celebrated Blood Victory Day earlier this week in remembrance of their legal victory over Arizona State University's Board of Regents. The Havasupai have lived deep within the Grand Canyon for centuries, but the story of this case begins in the 1990s.

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TED Radio Hour
8:23 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Can You Use Algorithms To Find Love?

Amy Webb explains how she found love with some help from algorithms.
Ryan Lash Courtesy of TED

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 4:07 pm

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode How We Love.

About Amy Webb's TEDTalk

Amy Webb was having no luck with online dating, so she started treating the world of online dating as data — effectively hacking her way to finding a spouse.

About Amy Webb

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TED Radio Hour
8:23 am
Fri April 25, 2014

What Happens To Our Brain When We're In Love?

Anthropologist Helen Fischer explains how our brains behave when we're in love.
Andrew Heavens Courtesy of TED

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 4:07 pm

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode How We Love.

About Helen Fisher's TEDTalk

Why do we crave love so much, even to the point that we would die for it? To learn more about our physical need for romantic love, Helen Fisher took MRIs of people in love — and people who had just been dumped.

About Helen Fisher

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Business
4:09 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Tech Giants Settle Class-Action Lawsuit

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 7:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Four tech giants, including Apple and Google, settled a class action lawsuit on Thursday - 64,000 workers claimed the companies conspired to hold down salaries. The plaintiffs will reportedly receive over $300 million, far short of what they were seeking.

NPR's Ina Jaffe reports.

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The Salt
2:08 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Got My Goat? Vermont Farms Put Fresh Meat On Refugee Tables

Theoneste Rwayitare, a Rwandan refugee who resettled in Vermont last year, pours powdered milk into a bucket for milking at the Vermont Goat Collaborative's Pine Island Farm.
Angela Evancie for NPR

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 10:47 am

It's easy to find goat milk and goat cheese in Vermont. Goat meat, not so much.

That's frustrating for the refugees, immigrants and others who've settled in the state who are accustomed to eating fresh goat meat. Though it's not so common in the U.S., it's a mainstay in many African, Asian and Caribbean diets.

But there's a movement afoot to meet the demand for goat meat throughout New England.

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All Tech Considered
5:30 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Life Outside The Fast Lane: Startups Wary Of Web Traffic Plan

Alexis Ohanian, co-founder of the Internet startup Reddit, says he and his partner had no connections and little money when they started the now-popular site.
Tanya Kechichian Courtesy of Hachette Book Group USA

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 10:24 pm

The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission is offering up some new rules to govern traffic on the Internet. The draft document could allow some Web companies to pay more for faster access.

It's the latest attempt by the FCC to adjust so-called network neutrality rules, initially intended to make sure that all traffic on the Internet moves at the same speed.

The new rules won't be made public until May, but some members of the startup world are already worried.

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The Two-Way
5:15 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Radioactive Leak At U.S. Waste Dump Was Preventable, Report Says

A worker drives an electric cart past air monitoring equipment inside a storage room of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, N.M., shown in this undated photo.
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 6:02 pm

A February accident at a nuclear waste dump that resulted in the contamination of 21 workers resulted in part from "poor management, ineffective maintenance and a lack of proper training and oversight," a Department of Energy report concludes.

NPR's Geoff Brumfiel says the report, released Thursday, says the release of radioactive material into the environment from the Feb. 14 accident at the underground Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, N.M., could have been prevented. The facility is a repository for defense-related nuclear waste.

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Shots - Health News
4:18 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Rural Hospitals Weigh Independence Against Need For Computer Help

Dr. Billy Oley (left) talks with Dr. William George in the Beartooth Billings Clinic in Red Lodge, Mont. The hospital became part of the Billings Clinic system in exchange for help with its digital medical records.
Eric Whitney for NPR

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 6:17 pm

One of the biggest challenges American hospitals face right now is moving to electronic medical records from old-fashioned paper files.

The switch is costing tens of billions of dollars, eating up tons of staff time, and it's especially tough for the country's 2,000 rural and small-town hospitals.

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All Tech Considered
4:03 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Tech Giants Pony Up Cash To Help Prevent Another Heartbleed

Google is among several companies putting money into a fund to help safeguard the Internet from possible security flaws in open-source software.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 6:17 pm

Google, Intel, Facebook and many other tech giants are pooling their money together — for the first time — to fix a glaring hole in cybersecurity. They're launching a multimillion-dollar fund to protect open-source code — the code that anyone can use for free, and that often gets overused and underprotected.

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Technology
3:15 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

What Do Net Neutrality Rules Mean For Web Users?

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 6:17 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

For more reaction, we turn to the person credited with coining the term net neutrality. Tim Wu is a law professor at Columbia University. He says if the proposed changes go into effect, consumers can expect prices to rise.

TIM WU: Companies like Netflix, companies that - like Amazon that rely on not paying cable and telephone companies to reach consumers will have to pay. And therefore it will end up costing the consumer more.

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