Science & Technology

Business
3:02 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Transatlantic Duo Looks Into The Future Of Flight

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 6:34 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

And now, Delta Airlines and Virgin Air go together like Ford and Jaguar? That one didn't go so well. But in the case of these two very different airlines, which are global partners, marriage appears to be working out. So say our next two guests, Delta CEO Richard Anderson and Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson, they're both in Washington attending the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Aviation Summit this week.

And they've joined me in the studio. Welcome to both of you.

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The Salt
1:14 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Farmers Need To Get 'Climate Smart' To Prep For What's Ahead

Farmers participate in a CGIAR climate training workshop on how to interpret seasonal rainfall forecasts in Kaffrine, Senegal.
Courtesy of J. Hansen/CGIAR Climate

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 6:39 pm

The planet's top experts on global warming released their latest predictions this week for how rising temperatures will change our lives, and in particular, what they mean for the production of food.

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The Two-Way
12:45 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Smithsonian's Air And Space Museum To Get $30 Million Spiffier

Where's the moon rock? Curators say national treasures are often overlooked in the museum's current display, which hasn't changed much since 1976.
National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 6:34 pm

Throngs of museum-goers mill through the grand entrance hall of the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., every day, gawking at such treasures as the Apollo 11 capsule that carried Neil Armstrong's crew to the moon and back, as well as Charles Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis airplane.

But the famous Milestones of Flight exhibit hasn't significantly changed since the museum opened in 1976.

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Krulwich Wonders...
11:59 am
Thu April 3, 2014

'Oh, Hello,' Says Andrew, As He Suddenly Grabs You By The Leg Or Neck

Andrew Ucles YouTube

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 1:22 pm

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Shots - Health News
10:40 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Good Day Sunshine: Could Morning Light Help Keep Us Lean?

iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 2:46 pm

Exposure to morning light, whether it's pure sunlight or bright indoor lighting, is associated with leaner body weights, researchers say.

The findings fit with a growing body of evidence that suggests keeping our internal body clocks synchronized with the natural light-dark cycle is beneficial to our health and our waistlines.

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The Two-Way
10:34 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Court In Turkey Orders Twitter Service Restored

A Twitter app on an iPhone screen. Turkey banned the social media service for two weeks, but a court has now ordered the ban lifted on constitutional grounds.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 12:51 pm

Twitter is back on in Turkey after a constitutional court ruled that a government-imposed ban on the social media service was a breach of free expression.

The country's telecom authority lifted the 2-week-old ban, after it was blocked in the runup to last Sunday's local elections.

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Shots - Health News
3:58 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Why Anthropologists Join An Ebola Outbreak Team

Health specialists work in an isolation ward for patients in Guékedou, southern Guinea.
Seyllou AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 1:07 pm

When disease strikes in the developing world, like the current Ebola outbreak in Guinea, doctors, nurses and epidemiologists from international organizations fly in to help.

So do anthropologists.

Understanding local customs — and fears — can go a long way in getting communities to cooperate with international health care workers, says Barry Hewlett, a medical anthropologist at Washington State University.

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The Salt
2:28 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Should We Close Part Of The Ocean To Keep Fish On The Plate?

A tuna fishing boat drags a cage of nets on the Mediterranean sea in 2010. (The Mediterranean is not considered to be part of the "high seas.")
Andreas Solaro AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 4:55 pm

For lovers of fatty tuna belly, canned albacore and swordfish kebabs, here's a question: Would you be willing to give them up for several years so that you could eat them perhaps for the rest of your life?

If a new proposal to ban fishing on the open ocean were to fly, that's essentially what we might be faced with. It's an idea that might help restore the populations of several rapidly disappearing fish – like tuna, swordfish and marlin — that we, and future generations, might like to continue to have as a food source.

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Shots - Health News
1:24 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Map Of The Developing Human Brain Shows Where Problems Begin

Images of the developing fetal brain show connections among brain regions.
Allen Institute for Brain Science; Bruce Fischl, Martinos Center for Biomedial Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 11:21 am

A high-resolution map of the human brain in utero is providing hints about the origins of brain disorders including schizophrenia and autism.

The map shows where genes are turned on and off throughout the entire brain at about the midpoint of pregnancy, a time when critical structures are taking shape, researchers reported Wednesday in the journal Nature.

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All Tech Considered
1:00 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

While Warning Of Chinese Cyberthreat, U.S. Launches Its Own Attack

Staff members study networking at the training room of the Huawei Technologies Co. headquarters in Shenzhen, China, in June 2011.
Kin Cheung AP

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 1:54 pm

The U.S. government has long complained about Chinese hacking and cyberattacks, but new documents show that the National Security Agency managed to penetrate the networks of Huawei, a large Chinese telecommunications firm, gathering information about its operations and potentially using equipment it sells to other countries to monitor their computer and telephone networks as well.

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