Science & Technology

The Two-Way
9:01 am
Fri July 11, 2014

Elephant Featured In Film 'Alexander' Killed By Thai Poachers

A photo released by the Ayutthaya Elephant Palace and Royal Kraal, shows Thai police officers examining the slain elephant.
AP

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 9:33 am

Poachers in Thailand killed a 50-year-old elephant who appeared in Oliver Stone's 2004 film Alexander before crudely hacking off the animal's giant tusks, according to The Bangkok Post.

The Asian elephant, named Phlai Khlao, was used in scenes from the movie starring Colin Farrell and Angelina Jolie. The animal had also been part of ceremonial performances for Thailand's royal family.

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NPR Story
4:00 am
Fri July 11, 2014

NSA Implementing Fix To Prevent Snowden-Like Security Breach

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 7:01 am

A year after Edward Snowden's digital heist, the NSA's chief technology officer says steps have been taken to stop future incidents. But he says there's no way for the NSA to be entirely secure.

Shots - Health News
7:52 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Mississippi Child Thought Cured Of HIV Shows Signs Of Infection

Human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 inserts its genetic material into the DNA of human cells, turning them into little HIV factories.
Eye of Science Science Source

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 9:21 am

A baby who generated great excitement last year because it appeared she had been cured of HIV is infected with the virus after all, health officials say.

This discovery is a setback for the child known as the "Mississippi baby." It also complicates efforts to test what had seemed like a promising new treatment for infants born with HIV.

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The Salt
4:00 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Alcohol Test: Does Eating Yeast Keep You From Getting Drunk?

The idea that it might be possible to keep drinking a delicious bottle of pinot noir or tall bottle of beer and go right back to work is a tempting one.
Alex Eben Meyer for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 1:35 pm

Sometimes we drink with the sole purpose of relaxing, or drowning the week's worries. But other times we just want to savor a special craft beer or vintage wine, or make that good meal taste even better.

And as we get older, we're warier of that third or fourth glass. The consequences of too much alcohol — the drowsiness, the confusion and the wobbling — are a bigger hindrance. And let's face it: A hangover at 36 isn't the same as one at 22.

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All Tech Considered
3:08 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

A New Device Lets You Track Your Preschooler ... And Listen In

KizON went on sale in South Korea this week, with North America and Europe to follow later this year. Its price has not yet been announced.
LG

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:51 pm

I was always thankful that my parents didn't "leash me" at the mall or grocery store when I was a child — but you'll never guess what parents can strap on their kids nowadays.

LG Electronics introduced a device Wednesday called the KizON. Meant for those in preschool and primary school, it's essentially a kid-tracking wristband.

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Shots - Health News
2:24 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Why HIV Spreads Less Easily In Heterosexual Couples

HIV particles (red) invade a human immune cell. When HIV is transmitted through sex, only the strongest versions of the virus establish long-term infection.
Chris Bjornberg/ScienceSource

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 6:07 pm

HIV is sexist.

A woman is twice as likely to catch the virus from an infected partner in a heterosexual relationship than a man is.

And homosexual men are at even greater risk. They're more than 20 times as likely to get infected from an HIV-positive partner than partners in a heterosexual relationship.

Now scientists at Microsoft Research and the Zambia-Emory HIV Project have a clue about why these disparities exist.

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Science & Technology
1:16 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

University Hospital Taking NICU Ophthalmology To Rural Areas

Ophthalmologist Dr. Clio Harper, M.D., examines the eyes of a premature infant at the University Hospital NICU. Dr. Harper comes to San Antonio from Austin each week to examine and treat infants with Retinopathy of Prematurity, or ROP
Credit Elizabeth Allen / UTHSC

University Hospital is participating in a study that doctors hope will save the eyesight of premature babies born in areas where ophthalmologists are in short supply.

The study looked at telemedicine exams used to diagnose retina problems associated with premature birth, or retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a disease that in the past caused blindness among most premature victims.

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Sports
11:39 am
Thu July 10, 2014

Twitter Turns World Cup Into A 'Global Sports Bar'

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 3:00 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
9:10 am
Thu July 10, 2014

Math Nerd Or Bookworm? Many Of The Same Genes Shape Both Abilities

A study of twins shows why being a good reader and a good math student may go hand in hand.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 12:23 pm

Many of us tend to align ourselves with either numbers or words. We're either math brains or we're reading brains.

In college, my fellow English majors joked about how none of us could long-divide to save our lives, while our friends in engineering groaned about the fact that Lit 101 was a graduation requirement.

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The Two-Way
6:26 am
Thu July 10, 2014

Hackers In China Reportedly Targeted U.S. Federal Workers

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 11:01 am

Chinese hackers successfully accessed U.S. government computer networks in March apparently hoping to find information about "tens of thousands of employees who have applied for top-secret security clearances," The New York Times reports.

The newspaper says the attack centered on the Office of Personnel Management was reportedly detected and blocked — but not before the hackers had gotten into some of the agency's databases.

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